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Asian Art Calendar of Events

Wednesday, December 07, 2022
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    New Masterworks: A Journey through Himalayan Art
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Jan 29, 2021 to Jan 08, 2024
    Detail: Masterworks: A Journey through Himalayan Art explores major strands in the development of art from the Himalayan region covering a period of more than one thousand years, with objects drawn primarily from the Rubin Museum’s collection.

    Masterworks is organized geographically and chronologically, showcasing the diverse regional traditions of Tibet in relation to the neighboring areas of Eastern India, Kashmir, Nepal, Bhutan, China, and Mongolia. Juxtaposing the art of Himalayan regions over time sheds light on the geographic, historical, religious, and artistic interrelationships among these cultures.

    This ongoing exhibition reflects our evolving understanding of the relatively young field of Himalayan art. Masterworks is regularly updated as new art objects and texts come to light, reflecting the latest developments in the field. The current iteration features several loans from the Zhiguan Museum of Fine Art, which brings further depth to the themes and extraordinary craftsmanship demonstrated throughout the exhibition.

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    New Gateway to Himalayan Art
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Jun 11, 2021 to Jun 04, 2023
    Detail: Gateway to Himalayan Art introduces you to the main forms, concepts, meanings, and traditions of Himalayan art represented in the Rubin Museum collection.

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    New Mandala Lab
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2021 to Oct 30, 2027
    Detail: An Interactive Space for Social, Emotional, and Ethical Learning

    The Mandala Lab, located on the Museum’s remodeled third floor, invites curiosity about our emotions. Consider how complex feelings show up in your everyday life and imagine how you might have the power to transform them.

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    New The Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Oct 11, 2021 to Oct 30, 2023
    Detail: Since it first opened, the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room has been one of the most popular installations at the Rubin Museum, providing an immersive experience inspired by a traditional shrine.

    Art and ritual objects are displayed as they would in an elaborate private household shrine, a space used for offerings, devotional prayer, rituals, and contemplation. The design of the Shrine Room showcases these objects while incorporating elements of traditional Tibetan architecture and the color schemes of Tibetan homes.

    For Museum visitors, this richly detailed, immersive installation provides an oasis for peaceful contemplation at the heart of the Rubin Museum.

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    New Shrine Room Projects
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Nov 12, 2021 to Oct 30, 2023
    Detail: In dialogue with the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room at the center of the gallery, Shrine Room Projects is an exhibition series that features contemporary artists who reinterpret traditional and religious iconography. This juxtaposition provides visitors with the opportunity to reflect on the themes and symbols emanating from the Shrine Room.

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    New Celebrating the Year of the Tiger
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jan 29, 2022 to Jan 17, 2023
    Detail: The traditional East Asian lunar calendar consists of a repeating twelve-year cycle, with each year corresponding to one of the twelve animals in the Chinese zodiac. The association of these creatures with the Chinese calendar began in the third century B.C. and became firmly established by the first century A.D. The twelve animals are, in sequence: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, ram, monkey, rooster, dog, and pig. Each is believed to embody certain traits that are manifested in the personalities of people born in that year. February 1, 2022, marks the beginning of the Year of the Tiger, a creature characterized as brave, heroic, resolute, and vigorous.

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    New Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Mar 18, 2022 to Jan 16, 2023
    Detail: Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans presents the diverse ways that Tibetan Buddhist artworks and practices have served as roadmaps to well-being, with over 25 objects from the Rubin Museum’s collection set alongside personal stories and experiences from Himalayan Americans. Centered around the themes of prevention, healing, and longevity, the exhibition highlights how these living traditions are transformed and adopted for today’s world, inspiring visitors to reflect on their own healing journeys.

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    New Underdogs and Antiheroes: Japanese Prints from the Moskowitz Collection
    Place: Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Smithsonian Institution - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave., SW, USA
    Date: Mar 19, 2022 to Jan 29, 2023
    Detail: Expect the unexpected. The exhibition Underdogs and Antiheroes: Japanese Prints from the Moskowitz Collection focuses on the captivating stories and urban legends of individuals living on the fringes of society in early modern Japan. Key subjects in theater, literature, and visual arts reveal antiheroes and underdogs whose virtues are often embodied by their rejection of societal norms, making them misfits and moral exemplars at the same time. The exhibition will follow virtuous bandits, tattooed firemen who love to fight, rogues from the kabuki theater, and others.

    Highlighting the transformative gift of the Pearl and Seymour Moskowitz Collection to the National Museum of Asian Art, Underdogs and Antiheroes features subjects that are not commonly associated with traditional Japanese print culture but were nevertheless central to the interests of an early modern public. The exhibition will explore new visual and thematic ground, further strengthening the museum’s trailblazing role in reconsidering presentations of Asian cultures.

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    New Samurai Splendor: Sword Fittings from Edo Japan
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Mar 21, 2022 to Mar 31, 2024
    Detail: After almost a century and a half of near-constant civil war and political upheaval, Japan unified under a new ruling family, the Tokugawa, in the early 1600s. Their reign lasted for more than 250 years, in an era referred to as the Edo period, after the town of Edo (present-day Tokyo) that became the new capital of Japan. The Tokugawa regime brought economic growth, prolonged peace, and widespread enjoyment of the arts and culture. The administration also imposed strict class separation and rigid regulations for all. As a result, the ruling class—with the shogun as governing military official, the daimyo as local feudal lords, and the samurai as their retainers—had only a few ways to display personal taste in public. Fittings and accessories for their swords, which were an indispensable symbol of power and authority, became a critical means of self-expression and a focal point of artistic creation.

    This installation explores the luxurious aspects of Edo-period sword fashion, a fascinating form of arms and armor rarely featured in exhibitions outside Japan. It presents a selection of exquisite sword mountings, fittings, and related objects, including maker’s sketchbooks—all drawn from The Met collection and many rarely or never exhibited before.

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    New Kingfisher Headdresses from China
    Place: The Art Institute of Chicago - Chicago, 111 South Michigan Avenue, USA
    Date: May 21, 2022 to May 21, 2023
    Detail: Since ancient times, Chinese poets have praised the plumage of the kingfisher, a bird widely found in the tropical regions of Asia.

    The brilliant turquoise-blue is not a pigment but results from the way their transparent feathers refract light. By the Song dynasty (960–1278), portraits of empresses showed them wearing headdresses adorned with kingfisher ornaments. Few examples of this fragile artistry have survived, and the earliest ones come from the tomb of the Wanli Emperor (reigned 1572–1620), in which archaeologists found four elaborate kingfisher crowns worn by his empresses.

    The vivid feathers were expensive, with the most prized specimens imported from Cambodia and Vietnam. Artisans cut them to shape before painstakingly pasting the feathers onto gilded metal backing that formed the structure of the headdresses. Precious and semiprecious stones such as rubies, agate, and jadeite as well as other valuable materials including amber, coral, and pearls added to the splendid effect. Although the most sumptuous examples were worn by empresses and consorts, aristocratic and wealthy women also wore kingfisher crowns and jewelry on special occasions such as birthdays and weddings. Popular motifs—bats, butterflies, dragons, and phoenixes—symbolized various aspects of good fortune.

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    New Kimono Style: The John C. Weber Collection
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jun 07, 2022 to Feb 20, 2023
    Detail: This exhibition will trace the transformation of the kimono from the late Edo period (1615–1868) through the early 20th century, as the T-shaped garment was adapted to suit the lifestyle of modern Japanese women. It will feature a remarkable selection of works from the renowned John C. Weber Collection of Japanese art that explore the mutual artistic exchanges between the kimono and Western fashion, as well as highlights from The Costume Institute’s collection.

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    New Scholars and Ancestors: Traditional Functions of Portraiture in China and Korea
    Place: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College - Oberlin, 87 North Main Street, Ohio, USA
    Date: Jun 09, 2022 to Dec 23, 2022
    Detail: Portraits are powerful images. We seem to feel an immediate connection with the people we see in them, even if they lived long ago or far away. Despite this sense of familiarity, prior to the 20th century in the elite cultures of China and Korea portraits were thought of very differently than in Europe or the Americas. People considered portraits private things; viewing them was usually reserved for family or others with close ties. And unlike landscape paintings or calligraphy, which were considered high forms of art, portraits were seen as functional art, produced by anonymous painters in professional studios.

    Three traditional functions of portraiture in East Asia are represented here: religious, memorial, and documentary. In China—from the 11th century until photographs all but replaced them in the 20th century—painted portraits were commissioned by families who could afford them for tombs or domestic religious use. In Korea from the late 17th through the 19th centuries, academies that trained government officials displayed portraits of famous graduates and associates in shrines. Finally, in both China and Korea, groups of prominent scholars and officials were sometimes documented in small, bust-length portraits that included their names and titles and were collected in albums.

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    New Recollections of Tokyo: 1923–1945
    Place: The Art Institute of Chicago - Chicago, 111 South Michigan Avenue, USA
    Date: Jul 02, 2022 to Sep 25, 2023
    Detail: In 1923, Tokyo was devastated by the Great Kantō earthquake. Despite the destruction caused by this natural disaster, the city developed at an astounding rate over the next few decades. During this period, a number of printmakers documented their impressions of the city’s ruin and rebirth. While some of these prints depict the remnants of destroyed buildings, many more show people enjoying the city’s new developments, from the bustling Ginza shopping district to the fashionable cafés of Shinjuku. This modern urban landscape became a favorite subject for artists such as Oda Kazuma (1882–1956), a lithographer who portrayed Tokyo’s crowded streets and nighttime attractions.

    The allure of Great Tokyo, as it came to be called, would be short-lived. The area was firebombed by Allied forces during World War II, causing another round of devastation. The prints made in the period between the earthquake and World War II thus became a kind of time capsule. In 1945, some artists were prompted to reissue their scenes of urban life, along with new prints that were similarly nostalgic; this expanded series was called Recollections of Tokyo and the complete series is on view in this exhibition. A number of the scenes featured in these prints are recognizable today, including views of Tokyo Station, Ueno Zoo, and the bars and clubs of Shinjuku. Taken together, such representations of forgotten or lost places and buildings remind us of time’s passage and the ever-changing nature of a dynamic urban metropolis.

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    New A Passion for Jade: The Bishop Collection
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jul 02, 2022 to Feb 17, 2025
    Detail: More than a hundred remarkable objects from the Heber Bishop collection, including carvings of jade, the most esteemed stone in China, and many other hardstones, are on view in this focused presentation. The refined works represent the sophisticated art of Chinese gemstone carvers during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911) as well as the highly accomplished skills of Mogul Indian (1526–1857) craftsmen, which provided an exotic inspiration to their Chinese counterparts. Also on view are a set of Chinese stone-working tools and illustrations of jade workshops, which will introduce the traditional method of working jade.

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    New Embracing Color: Enamel in Chinese Decorative Arts, 1300–1900
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jul 02, 2022 to Feb 17, 2025
    Detail: Enamel decoration is a significant element of Chinese decorative arts that has long been overlooked. This exhibition reveals the aesthetic, technical, and cultural achievement of Chinese enamel wares by demonstrating the transformative role of enamel during the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties. The first transformational moment occurred in the late 14th to 15th century, when the introduction of cloisonné enamel from the West, along with the development of porcelain with overglaze enamels, led to a shift away from a monochromatic palette to colorful works. The second transformation occurred in the late 17th to 18th century, when European enameling materials and techniques were brought to the Qing court and more subtle and varied color tones were developed on enamels applied over porcelain, metal, glass, and other mediums. In both moments, Chinese artists did not simply adopt or copy foreign techniques; they actively created new colors and styles that reflected their own taste. The more than 100 objects on view are drawn mainly from The Met collection.

    Rotation 1: July 2, 2022–April 30, 2023
    Rotation 2: May 20, 2023–March 24, 2024
    Rotation 3: April 13, 2024–Feb 17, 2025

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    New Life Full of Changes: Kenji Nakahashi
    Place: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College - Oberlin, 87 North Main Street, Ohio, USA
    Date: Jul 27, 2022 to Dec 23, 2022
    Detail: How can we characterize the art of Kenji Nakahashi (1947–2017)? Playful? Conceptual? Observational? Abstract? Ironic? All of these terms and more apply to the artist’s diverse work. This exhibition brings together photographs, prints, drawings, and one painting, which represent Nakahashi’s career from the early 1970s through the 1990s. Through this collection—donated anonymously to the museum last year—we can see, even in the earliest works, his mastery of varied techniques and styles combined with a unique artistic voice.

    Born and educated in Japan, Nakahashi moved to New York City in 1973 at the age of 26 after a short period working as a designer and illustrator. His artistic career in the United States proceeded largely on his own terms. He avoided commercial galleries and worked directly with curators at museums across the U.S., where his work is now widely represented.

    Nakahashi is best known for photography, an art in which he was largely self-taught. His photographs of everyday objects, moments, or settings reveal the often overlooked beauty, geometry, and even humor around us. Will seeing the world through Kenji Nakahashi’s eyes help you to find the remarkable in the unremarkable?

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    New New Directions: Abstract Prints by Yoshida Toshi
    Place: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College - Oberlin, 87 North Main Street, Ohio, USA
    Date: Jul 27, 2022 to Dec 23, 2022

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    New Jegi: Korean Ritual Objects
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Aug 06, 2022 to Oct 15, 2023
    Detail: Rituals and customs help celebrate life’s milestones, remember the past, and mark time. In addition to their significance as social conventions, rituals often reaffirm state, governmental, and religious principles. In Korea, performing ancestral rites (jesa) is an enduring tradition that embodies respect for parents and the commemoration of ancestors, key tenets of Confucianism.

    During the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910), Neo-Confucianism was the ruling ideology. People engaged in rituals on the birth and death anniversaries for ancestors upward of five generations, and on major holidays, such as the Lunar New Year and Chuseok (Harvest Moon Festival). Court ancestral rites became the bedrock of Joseon political life and were enacted on a grand scale that included musical and dance performances. A key feature throughout was a table bearing food and drink offerings presented on jegi, or ritual objects.

    This exhibition features the various types of ritual vessels and accessories that were used for this purpose and entombed, as well as the kinds of musical instruments played at state events. Though the vessels’ shapes, sizes, and materials may differ, a persistent feature is elevation, either through a high foot or a pedestal. In contemporary Korean society, no longer constrained by prescriptive state rules, jegi inspire contemporary artists and influence the form of everyday tableware.

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    New Meeting Tessai: Modern Japanese Art from the Cowles Collection
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art, National Museum of Asian Art. - 1050 Independence Ave SW, Freer Gallery of Art, National Museum of Asian Art., Washington, USA
    Date: Aug 13, 2022 to Feb 18, 2024
    Detail: Tomioka Tessai (1836–1924) exemplifies the modern Japanese painter. Contemporaries praised his avant-garde works, yet Tessai created his nonconformist paintings in a traditional way, basing them on ancient Japanese art and Ming and Qing paintings imported from China. Tessai’s teacher Ōtagaki Rengetsu (1791–1875)—nun, potter, calligrapher, poet, political activist—was at the vortex of immense political changes in Japan as the country’s feudal system collapsed and a constitutional monarchy was established. Rengetsu’s art, which harks back to inspirations from the twelfth century, inspired a generation of modern artists like Tessai.

    Meeting Tessai highlights a transformative gift of early modern and modern Japanese paintings and calligraphy from the Mary and Cheney Cowles Collection. It is also the first major American exhibition in five decades to explore the significance of pan–East Asian influences—a pertinent topic in today’s interconnected world—through the work of Tessai, Rengetsu, and modern Japanese painting.

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    New Text and Image in Southern Asia
    Place: The Cleveland Museum of Art - Cleveland, 11150 East Boulevard, Ohio, USA
    Date: Aug 26, 2022 to Mar 05, 2023
    Detail: The Cleveland Museum of Art is home to a collection of illuminated Buddhist and Jain manuscript pages, many of which were recently identified and dated by Phyllis Granoff, Lex Hixon Professor Emerita of World Religions at Yale University. This exhibition is dedicated to her work for the museum and is in celebration of her recent retirement. On view are palm-leaf manuscript pages reunited after having been separated, many with colophons providing new information about when and for whom they were made. The installation includes Buddhist manuscripts from the 1100s and shows the development of Jain manuscript painting from the 1200s to 1500s, alongside paintings of how they were used and vintage photographs of sites where they were kept. Small-scale sculptures in stone and gold from the same regions and periods are three-dimensional versions of imagery painted in miniature on the manuscript pages. Illuminated with narrative scenes, depictions of monks, donors, celestials, and enlightened or liberated beings, the exquisite works from India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Myanmar (Burma) reveal a surprising diversity of literary sources. The exhibition explores the relationship between the images and the content of the text, adding to a broader understanding of medieval South Asian manuscripts.

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    New Feathered Ink
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Aug 27, 2022 to Jan 29, 2023
    Detail: Across three galleries, Feathered Ink explores how Japanese artists have experimented over several centuries with different brush techniques in their depictions of avian subjects. Drawing from the Freer Gallery of Art’s extensive collection of bird-and-flower paintings, the exhibition includes hanging scroll paintings, folding screens, ceramics, and printed books.

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    New Noble Virtues: Nature as Symbol in Chinese Art
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Sep 10, 2022 to Jan 29, 2023
    Detail: Flowers, plants, and animals abound in Chinese art. From simple objects for the home to fancy vessels for the imperial court, popular prints to meticulously crafted paintings, manifestations of the natural world are found nearly everywhere.

    Sometimes these images are purely decorative, but often they carry meanings drawn from history, poetry, and cultural memory. Bamboo, for instance, which bends in the cold wind without breaking, can be a symbol of the virtuous person withstanding hard times; the plum blossom, which dares to bloom in the chill of early spring, an emblem of righteous bravery. For artists and viewers alike, associations such as these added layers of depth to an artwork. In this way, a vignette of the natural world could become a celebration of life, a wish for good fortune, or even a defiant act of protest.

    This exhibition, drawn primarily from The Met collection, introduces some of these themes through over 100 works of painting, calligraphy, and decorative arts.

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    New Rinpa: Creativity Across Time and Space
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art, National Museum of Asian Art. - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2022 to Feb 05, 2023
    Detail: The Japanese painting movement now known as Rinpa was a loose association of artists that began around the dawn of the seventeenth century and continued into the nineteenth century. Their aesthetic came to define an almost stereotypical image of Japanese art consisting of stylized forms in bright colors. We invite you to explore a selection of paintings and ceramics by several generations of Rinpa artists from our collection.

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    New A Splendid Land: Paintings from Royal Udaipur
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave. SW, USA
    Date: Nov 19, 2022 to May 14, 2023
    Detail: Around 1700, artists in Udaipur (a court in northwest India) began creating immersive paintings that conveyed the mood (bhava) of the city’s palaces, lakes, and mountains. These large paintings and their emphasis on lived experience have never been the focus of an exhibition.

    With dazzling paintings on paper and cloth—many on public view for the first time—A Splendid Land reveals how artists conveyed emotions, depicted places, celebrated water resources, and fostered personal bonds over some two hundred years in the rapidly changing political and cultural landscapes of early modern South Asia.

    The exhibition is organized as a journey that begins at Udaipur’s center and continues outward: first to the city, then to the countryside, and finally to the cosmos. A soundscape by the renowned filmmaker Amit Dutta invites contemporary audiences to sense–and not just see—the moods of these extraordinary places and paintings.

    A Splendid Land: Paintings from Royal Udaipur will also be on view at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Summer 2022.


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    New China through the Magnifying Glass: Masterpieces in Miniature and Detail
    Place: The Cleveland Museum of Art - Cleveland, 11150 East Boulevard, Ohio, USA
    Date: Dec 11, 2022 to Feb 26, 2023
    Detail: Objects in miniature have mesmerized people of all cultures throughout the ages. The CMA’s Chinese collection has an extraordinarily large number of high-quality small-scale objects and miniatures from various dynasties. This exhibition focuses on China and explores the role and function of miniatures and small-scale masterpieces of craftsmanship. About 80 objects dating from ancient times to the 1800s will be presented according to their respective use and function in themed sections: “Accessories and Ornaments,” “Objects of Ritual and Devotion,” “Luxury and Pride in Craftmanship,” “the Scholar’s Desk,” and “Toys, Boys, and Games.” These themes question each object’s function and role in society as a way of achieving a better understanding of China’s culture and history, as well as miniatures worldwide.

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    New Sam Francis and Japan: Emptiness Overflowing
    Place: Los Angeles County Museum of Art - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., USA
    Date: Apr 09, 2023 to Jul 16, 2023
    Detail: In the work of American artist Sam Francis (1923–1994), Western and Eastern aesthetics engage in a profound intercultural dialogue. Francis first traveled to Japan in 1957, developing a lifelong affinity for Japanese art and culture that influenced his work. His expressive handling of negative space shared pictorial and philosophical affinities with aspects of East Asian aesthetics, particularly the Japanese concept of “ma,” the dynamic between form and non-form. With over 60 works from LACMA’s collection and key lenders, this is the first exhibition to explore the artist’s work in relation to “ma” and other aspects of Japanese aesthetics. It will include works by Francis in the company of historic Japanese works to illustrate stylistic priorities shared by both. Also on view are works of contemporary Japanese artists (many associated with Gutai and Mono-Ha) whom Francis knew from his extensive time in Japan in the 1960s and ’70s.

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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    New Legacies of Empire
    Place: National War Museum - Edinburgh, Edinburgh Castle, United Kingdom
    Date: Nov 27, 2021 to Jan 29, 2023
    Detail: Legacies of Empire examines the histories connected to objects brought back from colonial conflict by the military forces of the British Empire.

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    New Japan: Courts And Culture
    Place: The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace - London, Buckingham Palace, United Kingdom
    Date: Apr 08, 2022 to Feb 26, 2023
    Detail: The Royal Collection holds some of the most significant examples of Japanese art and design in the western world. For the first time, highlights from this outstanding collection are brought together to tell the story of 300 years of diplomatic, artistic and cultural exchange between the British and Japanese royal and imperial families. The exhibition includes rare pieces of porcelain and lacquer, samurai armour, embroidered screens and diplomatic gifts from the reigns of James I to Her Majesty The Queen. Together, they offer a unique insight into the worlds of ritual, honour and artistry linking the courts and cultures of Britain and Japan.

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    New Japanese Contemporary Design
    Place: Gallery 3, National Museum of Scotland - Edinburgh, Chambers St., United Kingdom
    Date: May 06, 2022 to Mar 05, 2023
    Detail: From striking statement jewellery to prints and porcelain vases, this display considers how Japanese contemporary makers have combined innovative and traditional art, craft and design elements over the past five decades.

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    New Beguiling Beni: Safflower Red in Japanese Fashion
    Place: The Victoria & Albert Museum - London, Cromwell Rd, United Kingdom
    Date: Jun 02, 2022 to Mar 31, 2024
    Detail: The Japanese dye 'beni', made from safflower petals, produces red hues and an iridescent green. This display reveals its many uses in fashion, from heel-less shoes by Noritaka Tatehana, to textiles, cosmetics and ukiyo-e woodblock prints.

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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    New The Door to Japanese Art
    Place: Tokyo National Museum - Tokyo, 13-9 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Japan
    Date: Apr 01, 2022 to Mar 31, 2023

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    New ACM and Anima Mundi: Chinese Christian art from the Vatican Museums
    Place: Asian Civilisations Museum, Christian Art Gallery, Level 2 - Singapore, 1 Empress PIace, Singapore 179555, Singapore
    Date: Oct 01, 2022 to Oct 01, 2023
    Detail: From 1 October 2022
    Daily, 10am - 7pm
    Fridays, 10am - 9pm
    Christian Art Gallery, Level 2
    Asian Civilisations Museum

    Singapore's Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) welcomes a selection of Chinese Christian art from the Vatican Museums in Rome, in its latest rotation of the Christian Art Gallery. Drawn from the Anima Mundi (meaning "Soul of the World"), these are little-known treasures of Christian art made in Asia.

    The public will be able to view up-close how the Catholic Church was able to integrate traditional Asian elements into its art. These intricate objects reveal the ingenuity of Asian artisans and craftsmen, who were able to adapt their work to incorporate foreign aesthetics and ideas that made them more appealing to local audiences. The artistic and cultural exchanges expressed through these works demonstrate how art can foster meaningful dialogue among religions and cultures.

    These beautiful creations complement the existing display containing masterpieces from Singapore's National Collection, reminding us of the history of religious harmony and tolerance amid diverse faiths around the world. ACM and Anima Mundi are one of the few museums that have dedicated a permanent space to presenting Christian works of art made in Asia, which tell important stories of love, diversity, and resilience.

    ACM and Anima Mundi: Chinese Christian art from the Vatican Museums is a part of ACM's year-long series of programmes and gallery rotations in commemoration of its 25th anniversary, dedicated to the cross-cultural connections and shared heritage of Singapore and the region. Objects in this collaboration will be available for public viewing for a period of one year



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    New Intertwining Beauty and Creation - Interinfluence in Ceramic Art of East and West
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Oct 29, 2022 to Dec 18, 2022
    Detail: Rich in variety, the ceramics have enriched people’s lives with their unique forms and exotic designs. Not only are they rooted in the local cultures and climates, but they have also created fascinating cultures as people from Asia and Europe have interacted and been attracted to each other’s beautiful decorations and techniques. This exhibition invites all to the world of the beauty of ceramics born through the exchange between the East and West throughout the ancient to modern times, including Japanese, Chinese, Islamic ceramics, Meissen and Sèvres porcelain, as well as works of artists like Tomimoto Kenkichi (1886-1963) and Itaya Hazan (1872-1963).

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    New Finding Wonders: Celebrating 10 Years of Think! Contemporary Student Artworks
    Place: National Library Building, Levels 7 & 8 - Singapore, Singapore
    Date: Nov 04, 2022 to Dec 31, 2022
    Detail: Finding Wonders: Celebrating 10 Years of Think! Contemporary Student Artworks

    Explore the little wonders that exist in your daily life in Finding Wonders: Celebrating 10 Years of Think! Contemporary Student Artworks. As you journey through the exhibition, discover the many wonders that young students have found in the virtual world, in their dreams, in people and even in themselves, that inspired their artworks.

    Finding Wonders is the tenth edition of the Think! Contemporary programme, presented by the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) in partnership with CHIJ Our Lady Queen of Peace, Geylang Methodist School (Primary), Haig Girls’ School, Mayflower Primary School and St. Anthony’s Primary School. This exhibition spans across physical and virtual realms, showcasing more than 30 artworks created in 2021 and 2022.

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    New Body & Spirit: The Human Body in Thought and Practice
    Place: Asian Civilisations Museum - Singapore, 1 Empress Pl, Singapore 179555, Singapore
    Date: Nov 25, 2022 to Mar 26, 2023
    Detail: ACM explores wellness and the wholeness of body, spirit, and mind with Body & Spirit: The Human Body in Thought and Practice. Featuring over 100 objects from the National Collection, private collectors, and local communities, this special exhibition presents a stunning display of sacred and ritual art from Singapore and the region. Join us in contemplating the many ways in which religions in Asia understand the human body through rituals, healing practices, pilgrimage, and divine images.

    Complementing the main exhibition are two special showcases. Buddha Relics displays gems and other precious offerings found together with bone relics of the Buddha in the Piprahwa Stupa in India in 1898. In Vel Vel: The Burden Dance (a project by Sistrum), learn more about kavadi — elaborate structures carried in Thaipusam, a yearly procession celebrated by Singapore’s Tamil Hindu community.

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    New The Splendor of Edo Painting - Part I: Itō Jakuchū and Edo Painting
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Jan 07, 2023 to Feb 12, 2023
    Detail: The works collected by American collectors of Japanese art, Etsuko and Joe Price (Price Foundation) have been added to the Museum’s collection. This exhibition features works by Itō Jakuchū (1716-1800) and Maruyama Ōkyo (1733-95) who vividly colored the Kyoto art world in the 18th century as well as paintings by Sakai Hōitsu (1761-1828) who led the Edo Rimpa school. The exhibition will be held in two parts. The Edo period was a time of great prosperity in the history of Japanese painting with these prominent painters competing against each other. We hope you will enjoy the brilliant world of the gorgeous paintings by the master artists of the time.

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    New The Splendor of Edo Painting - Part II: Kyoto art world and Edo Rimpa
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Feb 21, 2023 to Mar 26, 2023
    Detail: The works collected by American collectors of Japanese art, Etsuko and Joe Price (Price Foundation) have been added to the Museum’s collection. This exhibition features works by Itō Jakuchū (1716-1800) and Maruyama Ōkyo (1733-95) who vividly colored the Kyoto art world in the 18th century as well as paintings by Sakai Hōitsu (1761-1828) who led the Edo Rimpa school. The exhibition will be held in two parts. The Edo period was a time of great prosperity in the history of Japanese painting with these prominent painters competing against each other. We hope you will enjoy the brilliant world of the gorgeous paintings by the master artists of the time.

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    New Lives at Dawn: Neolithic Painted Pottery
    Place: W. Shanshan - London, 3 Duke of York Street, St. James's, United Kingdom
    Date: Oct 11, 2022 to Dec 08, 2022

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    New Ming Fay: Journey Into Nature
    Place: Alisan Fine Arts - Central, 21/F Lyndhurst Tower, 1 Lyndhurst Terrace, Hong Kong
    Date: Sep 23, 2022 to Dec 24, 2022
    Detail: Alisan Fine Arts is delighted to announce Journey into Nature, the 4th solo exhibition for the Chinese-American sculptor and installation artist, Ming Fay, at our Central space. On display will be some of Ming Fay’s works that will be introduced to the Hong Kong audience for the first time. These include the wishbone series, the Tai Chi figure series, and early sketches that inspired his famous fruit sculptures. Other iconic works, such as the money tree branch and larger than life fruits, nuts and surreal vegetables, will also be displayed. The exhibition can be seen as an expansion of Ming Fay’s large-scale installation themed Garden of Life at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022, where viewers were invited into an unconventional Edenic utopia.

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