Asianart.com | Associations | Articles | Exhibitions | Galleries


Visitors' Forum

Asian Art  Forums - Detail List
Asian Art Forums

Message Listing by Date:
Message Index | Back | Post a New Message | Search | Private Mail | FAQ
Subject:Jade Statuary
Posted By: Don Tue, Jan 05, 2021 IP: 89.187.175.119

Hi,
I am wondering if anyone has ideas about whether these are antique, what type of jade they are and general valuation. I have a set of these.
Thank you



Subject:Re: Jade Statuary
Posted By: Mark Adams Wed, Jan 06, 2021

Hi Don,
Why do you think this carving is jade?
It's serpentine and modern.
[email protected]

Subject:Re: Jade Statuary
Posted By: Don Wed, Jan 06, 2021

Hi Mark,
I was told it was jade by my wife's Grandparents. They owned it for 25 years and I've had it for another 23 years. Maybe I need to get that verified. It was also given a value back in the mid 90's of $600 so that also leads me to believe its jade.
Thanks

Subject:Re: Jade Statuary
Posted By: Mark Adams Thu, Jan 07, 2021

Hi Don,
I don't think it's jadeite jade. Just my thoughts based on a single image.
It would need to be handled and verified etc.
[email protected]

Subject:Re: Jade Statuary
Posted By: Bill H Thu, Jan 07, 2021

Don, China began running out of raw jade supplies, consisting of the true jades nephrite and jadeite, during the Ming dynasty. Imperial and other jade carvers began importing mostly jadeite from across the border in Burma during the Qing period.

Serpentine, also called Bowenite, has been the convincing false jade that has been much the stone of choice used for Mainland and many other export jadelike carvings since then. It means little what you relatives may have taken for truth when they were told it was "Chinese jade", because the Chinese lexicon is full of such euphemistic terms for these carvings. The best way of determining authenticity is to subject the carving to a relative density test, to determine the stone's underwater and dry weights, then use a math formula to figure actual density on the Moh's geological scale of hardness. True jades are very near the top of the scale, behind diamond and sapphire.

Please see the link for further information. And photo of a Kangxi (1662-1722) period nephrite jade censer.

Best regards,

Bill H.




URL Title :Jade Information



Asianart.com | Associations | Articles | Exhibitions | Galleries |