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Subject:How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Ray Thu, Oct 07, 2021 IP: 24.15.153.178

Hello,
This is a large platter or bowl. 17" wide and 2" high. It has some imperfections at the bottom where it is signed. It is completely hand painted and the glaze is over the paint. there are blue smudges under the rim which are also under the glaze. Can you tell how old is it approximately?
Thanks.







Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Ray Fri, Oct 08, 2021

Adding a few more pictures.







Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Mark Adams Fri, Oct 08, 2021

I believe it's Japanese. From the Meiji period 1868-1912.
Regards,
[email protected]

Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Ray Sat, Oct 09, 2021

Thank you very much Mark for your help in identifying both the age and the origin. Because of the mark, I thought it was Chinese, which apparently it is not.
Thanks again,
Ray

Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Martin Michels Fri, Oct 08, 2021

The imperfections you mentioned is an indication that it's a Japanese platter with a copied Chinese reign mark. This imperfections were due to the way these Japanese platters were baked, you won't find these on Chinese porcelain.
The mark reads in Japanese: Daimin Seika Nen Zo 大明 成化 年造 (= Made in the great Ming (emperor) Chenghua period), in Chinese it's pronounced as: Da Ming Chenghua Nian Zao.
Date: 2nd part of the 19th century, late Edo era or Meiji era.
Regards,
Martin.

Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Ray Sat, Oct 09, 2021

Thanks Martin for the really helpful information.
Just out of curiosity, why did Japanese potters put Chinese reign marks on their pieces? was it deceive the buyers (for example if the Chinese pieces were more expensive), or were there other reasons?
Thank you again,
Ray

Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Martin Michels Mon, Oct 11, 2021

Hello Ray,
In most cases the Chinese reign marks in the Meiji period (1856-1912) were used out of respect and / or because the decoration was (partly) copied from original Chinese pieces. In the late Edo period (before the Meiji period) the artists were not allowed to use their names as a mark, so you often see marks like Chinese reign marks, or also Fuku 福 marks on those older pieces.
Regards,
Martin.

Subject:Re: How old is this large platter?
Posted By: Ray Wed, Oct 13, 2021

Thanks again Martin for your very helpful information and answering my question.
Ray


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