In the Khasa Malla Tradition
A Thanka of Vikram Shahi (r. 1602-1631) King of Jumla

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Figure 4: Bodhisattva, probably Avalokiteśvara
Copper with traces of gilding
W. Nepal/ W. Tibet
Second half of the 13th century
20 cm.
(Pritzker Collection)

Published:
Alsop, Ian, "The Metal Sculpture of the Khasa Mallas of West Nepal/West Tibet" in Singer, ,J.C.; Denwood, P. eds.  Tibetan Art: Towards a Definition of Style.  London: Laurence King Publishing, 1997.
Reedy, Chandra L.  Himalayan Bronzes:  Technology, Style and Choices.  Newark:  University of Delaware Press, 1997.
Alsop, Ian, "The Metal Sculpture of the Khasa Mallas of West Nepal/West Tibet" asianart.com: August 26, 2005, https://www.asianart.com/articles/khasa/index.html

Inscribed both on the rear and the front rim of the sculpture. See Alsop, Ian, "The Metal Sculpture of the Khasa Mallas of West Nepal/West Tibet" asianart.com: August 26, 2005, https://www.asianart.com/articles/khasa/index.html, notes 33-35. On the rear, in two lines:  1. śrīrīdhābhaṃḍārani 2. dānapati, rākukāmi. This inscription clearly mentions a donor, probably one Rīdhābhaṃḍārani. Dr. Gouriswar Bhattacharya (personal communication) remarked that the inscription resembles early Eastern Indian scripts, which is of course not what one would expect. We cannot exclude the possibility that this inscription, and thus the sculpture itself, is earlier than the inscription mentioning Aśokacalla. Further study may bring some light on this conundrum.
The inscription on the front rim reads: śrī aśokacalla prasādakiyo saḍā(?hā)tmakasciraṃjayatu. "Donated (for?) śrī Aśokacalla, may he enjoy long life" This inscription is in early Devanāgarī.

It is possible that the donor of the rear inscription, and thus the sculpture itself, is earlier than Aśokacalla.