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Subject:peach bloom vase - This Thread is closed
Posted By: Francis Tan Tue, Apr 10, 2007 IP: 121.44.92.137

I bought this vase in Australia from a estate auction several years ago, can anyone tell me if it is a 19th century replica or a Kangxi period vase? Thanks







Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Anthony J Allen Tue, Apr 10, 2007

Hi Francis,
In my opinion this dates to the Republic period, possibly as late as 1930.
Regards
Tony

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Wed, Apr 11, 2007

Hi Francis,

I thought it would better serve your needs, to illustrate for you the differences between a real Kangxi period peachbloom and a good copy.

Notice the differences of the mouth rim area, and the ridge lines in your copy. Now compare the two and study the shapes.

Regards, Edward Shumaker





Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Daniel Drabek Thu, Apr 12, 2007

What a difference between the perfect, graceful shape of the original and the copy. Thanks for posting, Ed.
DD

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Daniel Drabek Fri, Apr 13, 2007

For what it's worth, I snapped a picture of this vase today at the Asian Arts Museum in San Francisco. It is of similar shape and color, but with some significant differences. And it has only a single ring on the neck. DD



Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: larry Fri, Apr 13, 2007

hi, there are so many modern fake peices out there and they all look perfect just like Ed's picture above in beijing china so don't be fool. If you don't believe me go take a trip to china. Tese days looking right is not enough to say it is real as they fake monochromes so perfectly. Make sure if it is expensive look for provenance or tl test it at oxford lab they can test small pieces as well. If not correct return it.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Steven Low Wed, Apr 11, 2007

Hi Francis
You may have a Qing piece according to the mark underneath the vase. The first two characters reading from the right hand side means Da Qing. Da means big or great. The middle 2 tells you the name of the emperor. I can't tell as the characters are so out of focus. The last 2 means year made. It may be the reign of Kangxi(1662-1722).
Don't be too happy, this piece may be a modern reproduction, ie it could be a fake. There is a city in China that makes fake Ming and Qing. porcelain. Even the experts get fooled.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: phil Wed, Apr 11, 2007

"There is a city in China that makes fake Ming and Qing. porcelain."

Understatement or not?

Phil.


Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: phil Wed, Apr 11, 2007

BTW, agree with Tony that this is early 20thC piece.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Frank Wed, Apr 11, 2007

thanks for all your opinion. Yes this vase has been a puzzle. I have it seen by various auction house specialist and most did say it was a nineteen century copy. however it only cost me 200 aussie. A friend noted how well it was potted and how the galze turn from pink to clear just before the foot and not adrop getting to the foot. As for the ridging i thought that was a common feature of Kangxi porcelain especially the blue and white most apparent on the base of such vases. I think the best option to dating is still the TLS however it is probably too small to test. Some of the larger vases canb e tested but it is not accurate to tell if it is forexample kangxi or yongzheng but just 18th century or 19th century or 20th.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: phil Thu, Apr 12, 2007

Hi,
a TL test is unnecessary to date this vase which I think has already been done fairly accurately.
Ed posted a reference for comparison & noted key points, I think it`s possible also to look at the mark in this case for further clues. As I recall with Kangxi Imperial peachbloom pieces the mark should be written either in two horizontal lines or two vertical columns, I hope someone will correct me if I`m wrong but I think the fact that your vase is marked with three vertical columns also indicates, or rather confirms that you have a later piece.

Phil.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Sat, Apr 14, 2007

To Forum Members,

..." Now I see you have posted a photo of a peachbloom vase on another question above. I wonder if you noticed that it had been cut down from the neck?"

So wrote; Anthony J. Allen Apr 12, 2007 (02:00 PM) on the T'sung thread (A continuation of the debate).

I write this for the benefit of all, but specially for the benefit of Francis Tan.

The peachbloom vase as illustrated is from the Nov. issue of ESKENAZI, a catalog of fine Asian art.

Mr. Eskenazi is a trully renowned expert on the subject of fine Chinese antique porcelain, he is often consulted by Sothebys and Christies as well as the worlds most respected museums.

A full description of this vase is profusely covered in minute detail, and no mention is made in reference to the mouth rim being reduced.

The illustrated example is said to be the rarest of the peachbloom shapes of the Kangxi period (1662-1722). It should be noted that the mouth rim has a subtle flared rim, that is radically different from later productions, such as the one illustrated by Mr.Tan.

This vase is known as sanxian ('three string') or laifu ('radish') vase. A description of the vase relative to the mouth area is as follows...,

"The rim shows white under a transparent glaze, as do the uneven edges of the 'strings'."

It is understood why Mr. Allen would assume that the rim has been reduced, but this is not the case with this very rare example. For the benefit of the forum, take special care when making a visual study of the shape and glaze, specially the slightly thicker glaze in the absence of ridge lines.

Phil, the Kangxi peachbloom vase has the Kangxi mark arranged in three columns of two characters each, as is shown on Mr. Tan's example as well.

Regards, Armchair General



Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Anthony J Allen Sun, Apr 15, 2007

Ed,
I accept that there is a vase in the National Palace Museum in Taiwan, with a throat that approaches the example you show.

But why is that you regularly post images with no comment as to their attribution, until someone responds to your posting. Then you appear to become the "know-all", and your comments about this vase shape being the rarest of those peachblooms produced in the Kangxi period are simply not correct.

The rarest shape is that with the dragon in relief on the outside.
Touche.
Tony

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Tony,

So that there is no confusion, I will first quote myself.

Quote: "The illustrated example is said to be the rarest of the peachbloom shapes of the Kangxi period (1662-1722)."

From the book: "This is one of the rarest types of Kangxi peachbloom vessels. Its names are descriptive, the three rings around the neck recalling the strings of a musical instrument."

Tony, from the description the text is describing the shape.

Quote: "Then you appear to become the "know-all"

Comment: Your perceptions are thwarted, as you continue to ignore scholarly references, assuming that for a pretense, that I make of myself a know it all.

Here is the evidence for all to view, as published by ESKENAZI, to coincide with Asian Art in London.

Regards, Edward Shumaker



Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: phil Mon, Apr 16, 2007

Interesting Ed, I tried to check this as I thought I`d remembered correctly, at least something stuck in my mind regarding marks on peach bloom pieces.
From the gotheborg website I found this; " The only time a Kangxi Imperial mark appeared without the circles was on the peachbloom wares and certain other scholar's table items and it is always 6 characters written either in two horizontal lines or two vertical columns."

Maybe Tony or others can comment?

Phil.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Francis Tan Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Regarding the reign mark chinese language is normally written in vertical column from right to left. 6 character marks in 3 vertical column is normally how Kangxi mark is written. A good book is -For The Imperial Court Qing Porcelain from the Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art. I suggest you you get this book if you like collecting imperial porcelain. Regards Francis

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Mr.Tan,

Thank you for the suggestion, however at the time of this posting, I have since added to my collection of reference materials 9 books, and 4 more are on the way.

I want to further thank you for your indepth knowledge on the Chinese language and the methods employed relative to the style and arrangement.

But perhaps further research is required on your part, of the different styles of arrangement of the nien-hao. It would enlighten your sensible approach on this matter.

Quote: " The only time a Kangxi Imperial mark appeared without the circles was on the peachbloom wares and certain other scholar's table items and it is always 6 characters written either in two horizontal lines or two vertical columns."

Comment: I believe this statement belongs to Mike Vermeer; he is consulted by three major U.S. museums.

I am not suggesting that Mr. Allen does not have a good understanding of imperial porcelain, but perhaps he would grace and enhance your knowledge of the different methods and arrangements of the imperial system and methods used in the early wares of the Ming and Qing periods.

I say this, because you will not hear it from me, nor is it likely that you will settle for the informed opinions of others; but will continue your quest for the answer that would best suit your desire..., translation you will only hear what you want.

BTW, take another photo close-up of the base, and the nien-hao, for it will reveal the truth that your vase is a much later production than what Mr. Allen has suggested.

Regards, Edward Shumaker

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Francis Wed, Apr 18, 2007

Dear Edward, these are more photos. I hope they are clear enough. I also incude a photo of a green peach bloom pot from the percival david foundation. I think there are several diffences but i notice they the Kangxi reign marks for 6 different items in this book are all written in slightly different fashion only thing i noted is the strokes in the last character zik is more compress and less defined in the kangxi reign than other reigns. Regards Francis







Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Wed, Apr 18, 2007

Mr. Tan,

Thank you for the additional photos and reference.

However, there is a dealer here in North Carolina that has an exact copy of your peachbloom vase, with exception to the slight difference of the painting style of the nien hao, but like your copy it had a smooth light brown/tan finish to the base rim.

It was very beautiful, and we both agreed that it was a later 20th century copy. This does not mean that your copy can not be late 19th and early 20th, but what it does tell us, is that there was copies being made throughout the 18th-20th centuries.

I was surprised to learn that there is a peachbloom seal-paste box illustrated in the Guwan-tu (Pictures of Ancient Playthings) dated in accordance to the year of 1729, of the Yongzheng period. It was highlighted by the author, Regina Krahl by courtesy of the V&A museum.

At any rate, I do not think that your vase is a fake, but rather a very faithful copy honoring an earlier reign. It is trully a very beautiful vase.

Regards, Edward Shumaker

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: phil Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Francis, please read the last sentence which clearly specifies the difference found only on imperial peach bloom.

"it is always 6 characters written either in two horizontal lines or two vertical columns."

Phil.

Phil.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Francis Tan Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Dear Phil, Pls go to a reputable auction house like Christies Bonhams or Sotherbys when there is a chinese art sale and see first hand or ask them how such marks should be written I suspect you will have a lot to learn or like wise get the book i suggested. there are 3 pieces from Percival David Foundation with marks written in 3 two character vertical line with no circles. Regards Francis

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Anthony J Allen Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Ed,
Again you don't remember what you said, so may I quote you:
"The illustrated example is said to be the rarest of the peachbloom shapes of the Kangxi period (1662-1722)".

That is not what Eskenazi said. He said it was one of the rarest shapes.

The rarest shape is that with the dragon in relief.

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Tony,

Quote: "The illustrated example is said to be the rarest of the peachbloom shapes of the Kangxi period (1662-1722)."

From the book: "This is one of the rarest types of Kangxi peachbloom vessels."

OK! but from my previous post I made that correction, but,.... its still one of the rarest!


Ed

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Anthony J Allen Tue, Apr 17, 2007

Ed,
I trust that Ian (moderator) will allow me to answer some of your remarks and not censor them, as he did last week when I responded to your irritating unknowledgeable comments posted as fact.

I agree with Francis Tan that the normal Imperial Kangxi mark, especially on the majority of the eight peachbloom shapes, was written in three columns of two characters. On the tiny bases, such as the Guanyin vase, the mark was written in two columns of three characters. In neither case can I recall seeing the marks encircled. I have no doubt that as with most Chinese porcelain, for almost every rule there will be an exception.

Ed, you cannot rely on books as your sole guide to knowledge of Chinese porcelain. You need "hands on" experience, and listing a whole series of unrelated quotes from the few books at your disposal, as you did recently, simply spoils the discussion for others.

Tony

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Wed, Apr 18, 2007

Tony,

This is a special attempt on my part to clarify my position.

I am a dealer and have kept a low profile. I travel alot, and handle extensively a lot of early wares and porcelains of the Ming and Qing dynasties.

My partner and I, have a very good business and great on-line store. She is astute, and every item is checked by a sothebys professional, in addition to extensive research.

I am every bit as passionate as you are, and I am deeply involved in the arts of Asia. I make more money than what most people can earn in a year.

But I am not in this for the money, its my life's passion.

So please stop your criticism and living to discredit me. I make every effort to help, and I invest a lot of time and thought into this forum.

I am not always right, and I have made mistakes, we all have. There has been times you were wrong, and we all have been wrong on a number of topics on this forum, one time or another.

I do not desire that this forum becomes a battle ground, so lets just call a truce, be friends, and do our best to help folks.

If you honestly can not say something positive in reply to this post, then please... lets end it here.

Regards, Edward Shumaker

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Sinoart Wed, Apr 18, 2007

(1) Phil is right.
A TL test is unnecessary to date this vase.
It is not very hard to distinguish ages of the peach-blood piece.
The peach-blood porcelain pieces appeased in Kangxi period and almost disappeared in the whole Qing dynasty due to their secret making crafts and skills.
Up to late Qing and early Republic, many peach-blood copy pieces were made, but they did not reach the lever of Kangxi’s.
Now, many modern peach-blood porcelain reproductions appear in market, but the lever is far from Kangxi’s, even can’t reach Republic’s.

(2) Ed posted a very rare peach-blood “Laifu” vase.
The “laifu” vase is top class in the peach-blood porcelain family.
I remember a peach-blood “laifu” vase was sold in New York Christie’s in 2003 for USD 352,704 that is the top sold-price in peach-blood porcelain family up to now.

(3) I agree with Tony that Francis’ vase looks like a late Qing and early Republic piece.

Regards

Sinoart

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Anthony J Allen Wed, Apr 18, 2007

Ed,
Yet again it is necessary for me to remind you what you said earlier.

On 11 April 2006, you said on this forum, and I quote "Also, I am not a dealer, but a very dedicated art collector of Asian antiques; the value of an art object is no concern to me, but the history and the true story is everything to me".

Now you say (above) "I am a dealer and have kept a low profile. I travel alot, and handle extensively a lot of early wares and porcelains of the Ming and Qing dynasties. My partner and I, have a very good business and great on-line store. She is astute, and every item is checked by a sothebys professional, in addition to extensive research. I am every bit as passionate as you are, and I am deeply involved in the arts of Asia. I make more money than what most people can earn in a year."

I take it, if you are a dealer, you have been one for less than one year. Now I am puzzled; curious if you like. A Google search didn't throw you up and I cannot find your web-site. Can you tell us what it is?

Now back to Francis' peachbloom. I ventured an opinion that it was Republic period, perhaps as late as 1930. Sinoart says late Qing or early Republic. You said "BTW, take another photo close-up of the base, and the nien-hao, for it will reveal the truth that your vase is a much later production than what Mr. Allen has suggested."

I do not know of any late Qing peachblooms. The potters had lost the ability to make it, and there are to my knowledge no Tongzhi, Guangxu or Xuantong mark and period peachbloom wares in any published collection. At one stage I had a Guangxu marked vase from the Imperial factory that had a small patch of underglaze green on it, suggesting that they may have had the materials to fire it accidentally.

That is the reason that I suggested Republic period.

Tony



Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Wed, Apr 18, 2007

Tony,

You are correct,... less than one year, in fact just one month.

"I cannot find your web-site. Can you tell us what it is?"

No! I am not stupid, I won't reveal my sources or expose myself to attack. The website is under my partner's name, besides that can be viewed as soliciting on the forum, which I will not be a part of!

But before you may think I am lying, there is one person that contributes on this forum that knows.

Quote: I do not know of any late Qing peachblooms. The potters had lost the ability to make it, and there are to my knowledge no Tongzhi, Guangxu or Xuantong mark and period peachbloom wares in any published collection.

Comment: prove it! I find no record affirming either way. I do know that almost every glaze color has been copied throughout the Ming and Qing dynasties, why not peachbloom?

There is at least one copy I know of in the V&A, dated (as pictured) to 1729 Yongzheng period.

I think, it is possible, due the relative newness of the 19th and early 20th examples, may have been overlooked, or dismissed by scholars.

Now that is very possible, when we consider kitchen Qing, and peoples wares in the Ming and Qing dynasties; because of the lack of interest.

Yes, I know its not relative to the peachbloom topic, but what I am trying to say, is that were many copies of various glaze colors and effects, mimicing the shapes of earlier vessels and forms.

Its just a theory, but a plausible one. We simply don't have enough data to confirm either way, but I predict that in the near future, by way of accidental discovery, that peachblooms were being produced on a much more massive scale, than what was previously known.

I further predict, that a kiln just outside Jingdezhen will bear the results of my theory. So to the moderators of this forum, keep these predictions in mind.

Far flung,... Yes! possible,...Yes!

Regards, Edward Shumaker


Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Anthony J Allen Thu, Apr 19, 2007

Ed,



I ventured the opinion " I do not know of any late Qing peachblooms. The potters had lost the ability to make it, and there are to my knowledge no Tongzhi, Guangxu or Xuantong mark and period peachbloom wares in any published collection"

You responded, "Prove it! I find no record affirming either way. I do know that almost every glaze color has been copied throughout the Ming and Qing dynasties, why not peachbloom?"

What am I meant to prove?. That I know of no late Qing peachblooms that are mark and period?

Shouldn't you be directing me to one of your books in your library which disproves my point?

Regards
Tony

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Fri, Apr 20, 2007

To the Moderator, Forum,

My apology for this unfortunate series of postings, I assume full responsibility for all omissions and errors.

I endeavor to contribute in an orderly fashion, both exhibiting photo and literary references of some of the most respected scholars in the field.

Instead of allowing myself to become upset, in lieu of the last posting made by one of our members; I have instead made a serious review of things that I have written.

I can readily understand where most people would be confused, not knowing the real facts.

With the moderator's (Ian) approval, I would like to set things in order.

1. I am a business professional and do make a decent salary.
2. I am an Asian art dealer, though new, yet I have been a collector long before I had joined any forum.
3. I can not divulge the company's website on this forum, because of certain concerns due the nature of the business, and other dealers, either seeking to discredit or slander the business.


6. From now on, if Mr.Allen makes a reply to any post, wherein I give a response to another member's questions, I will need to ignore him.

7. I am often accused of disrupting or destroying the flow of conversation of other contributors. If I am guilty of this, then by all means do forgive me, for it has always been just my desire to help out.

Regards, Edward Shumaker

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Stefanie Riedel Sun, Dec 08, 2019

I am just writing, because I am wondering why no one has given an answer.
This thread is one which is a little similar.
And of course, I thought that Mister Anthony J. Allen maybe could give me a help.
Just want to rule out that it could have a higher worth,
and I am the only person in my local radius who is interested in asian porcelains, so want to exclude that if so, it will disappear from the rest of the world.
I did add a few pictures. Is there not everything shown or do exist other problems to examine it?
Just wanted to send the link.
There are three fishermen on the item, all have manchu hair style, one on the back side wears han clothing. The other details, which I am not clear about, are written in the associated thread:

https://www.asianart.com/phpforum/index.php?method=detailAll&Id=122488


Thank you very much for the interest and maybe an answer (I hope for)

Many greetings!
(from Germany)
Stefanie







Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Mark Adams Mon, Dec 09, 2019

Hi Stephanie,
Unfortunately your item is post 2970. The base displays a sauger-white glaze. The figures are outlined with a distinct black line.
In your area you have a very good dealer wyssemaria-art.
[email protected]

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Mark Adams Mon, Dec 09, 2019

Sorry I am using a mobile and pushed post instead of edit therefore a few spelling mistakes etc.
Item post 1970. Displays a suger-white base.
Thick black lines indicates modern.
Good dealer in your area named Xin from wyssemaria-art
Mark

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Stefanie Riedel Tue, Dec 10, 2019

Thank you for the answer.

I have a question. You mentioned that is has a sugar-white base. I have two pictures from seal paste boxes (peach-bloom), from kangxi period (not later).
Others I found from period have also a white base. What does sugar-white mean, is it "too" white or has it any undertone?
I can not really see differents, please could you tell me? Thank you very much!

Here the pictures, and one of the bottom of mine:








Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Mark Adams Wed, Dec 11, 2019

There is a very informative website called bidamount.com that has uploaded various videos dealing with fake chinese porcelain. It clearly shows the difference in colours of porcelain via the different periods. I would highly recommend that you view said videos in order to gain an understanding.
It is operated by Peter Coombs.
[email protected]

Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Stefanie Riedel Sat, Dec 28, 2019

Hi!

Thank you very much for your reply.
I just wanted to append that I have the information from the site you have referred in your last message (bidamount.com), that the tea caddy it is most probably from 1920s or 1930s decades.

For me this is good news, just because I am collecting porcelain european(mostly) and chinese (but just since three months, I was in a porcelain museum in Naples that summer where they also had many chinese, I will go to other museums with asian art in the next time as well) that is not younger than the 40ies decade.


Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Edward Shumaker Thu, Apr 19, 2007

Tony,

Doubtless, you would have noted my reply to your statement.

"There are to my knowledge no Tongzhi, Guangxu or Xuantong mark and period peachbloom wares in any published collection."

Of which my reply states.

"prove it! I find no record affirming either way. I do know that almost every glaze color has been copied throughout the Ming and Qing dynasties, why not peachbloom?"

Comment: I am not implicating mark and period peachbloom of the reigns that you mentioned above, but I am suggesting that there were peachbloom or peachbloom like glazes.

I am sorry, if you should think that I am fudging the truth, or hiding something, or can't remember everything that was said, etc,etc.

I have nothing to hide, and the quote you cited on 11 April,2006 was indeed very true at the time; in fact, I would not be surprised that you will say something negative in relation to my being a relative new dealer; saying something to the effect that being new shows a lack of experience, or handling.

But the fact remains that I have handled on a regular basis the wares of the early periods and of the Ming and Qing, in addition that I have been an avid collector before turning into a dealer.

I find it very difficult to let go some items that I find in the market, because I am a history buff and art collector at heart.

Tony, lets not do this anymore, but rather just stick to the topics relative to the posted wares, otherwise it will appear that you and I are trying to discredit each other, and set a negative tone for the new comer.

I don't agree with everything you say, and I doubt that everyone agrees with you on every point made, and the same can be said for myself.

But please, don't use this forum as a shooting gallery! and I beg you for the sake of others,... don't punish folks for having a difference of opinion, otherwise it is you my dear friend, that is destroying good conversation and the contributions of others.

Ed






Subject:Re: peach bloom vase
Posted By: Sinoart Fri, Apr 20, 2007

Tony and Ed:
For Chinese imperial porcelain reproduction, “Late Qing and early Republic” is a very important and particular period.
In this case, “Late Qing and early Republic” means: Late Guangxu (1900-1908), Xuantong (1908-1911), early Republic (1012-1920’s).
Why?
From about 1900, the imperial porcelain was allowed to enter market and the selling and buying was no longer to be illegal. Then, the copying imperial pieces became a new porcelain making line.
During this period. Many reproduction-masters appeased, such as Zhan-Yuanguang, Zhan-xinqiang, Liu-yongqing, Guo-Baochang, Liu-Mianzhi, Li-chunsheng, Fan-huichuan, wei-shancheng…… and many anonymous masters…….
The peach-blood copy pieces, all written Kangxi mark, were reproduced during this period. It is proved by some Chinese porcelain scholars and collectors.
The discussing how to judge and distinguish Kongxi’s peach-blood from others, is a main topic for this Asian Art Forums that will benefit to everyone.
Any incorrect, please point out…..Thanks
Regards

Sinoart

Subject:THIS POSTING THREAD IS CLOSED
Posted By: Ian Fri, Apr 20, 2007

I have decided to close this posting thread, since the last few postings have had little to do with the peachbloom vase of the subject and more and more with personal remarks, which are not the subject of the forum.

Please note the text of the forum home page " Postings that are inappropriate, of an overly personal nature, or are deemed to be pure nonsense, will not be validated. Validation is at the discretion of the editors and moderators of the forum."

I have edited a few of the postings on this and another thread on the basis of the above criteria, but I'm sure you can understand I've got better things to do.

My advice, if someone seems to be attacking you personally on this forum or making a ludicrous claim, ignore the attack; If they make a claim or state an opinion you feel to be totally baseless it is enough to point out why you feel that way. Please stick to the subject.

I think all knowledgeable members of the forum will be able to make up their minds about the value of the opinions of posters without prompting from anyone.

Any posting with personal remarks will henceforth not be validated. Please, please keep the subject matter to of your posts to...the subject matter.


Thank you

Ian Alsop


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