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Asian Art Calendar of Events

Friday, April 20, 2018
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    Old Gateway to Himalayan Art
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Jun 29, 2016 to May 28, 2018
    Detail: Gateway to Himalayan Art introduces visitors to the main forms, concepts, and meanings of Himalayan art represented in our collection. A large multimedia map orients the visitors and highlights cultural regions of a diverse Himalayan cultural sphere that includes parts of present day India, China, Nepal, Bhutan, and Mongolia. Visitors are invited to explore exemplary objects from the Museum’s collection, organized and presented in thematic sections: Figures and Symbols, Materials and Techniques, and Purpose and Function.

    The exhibition employs a concise and informative approach to convey the principal notions inherent in the rich traditions of Himalayan art to first-time visitors and specialists alike. In addition to sculptures and paintings, objects such as a stupa, prayer wheel, and ritual implements demonstrate that their patrons sought the accumulation of merit and hoped for wealth, long life, and spiritual gains, all to be fulfilled through the ritual use of these objects and commissioning works of art.

    Among the featured installations are a display that explains the process of Nepalese lost-wax metal casting and a presentation of the stages of Tibetan hanging scroll painting (thangka). Visitors will also encounter life-size reproductions of murals from Tibet’s Lukhang Temple, photographed by Thomas Laird and Clint Clemens.

    As a whole the exhibition provides visitors with tools for understanding the artistic traditions presented throughout the museum, including a Looking Guide, a take away brochure and an audio guide.


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    Old Infinite Compassion: Avalokiteshvara in Asian Art
    Place: Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art - Staten Island, 338 Lighthouse Avenue, New York, USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2016 to Sep 30, 2018
    Detail: Infinite Compassion is an art exhibition of images that embody the concept of compassion but the scope is much larger — it aims to encourage us to meditate on our capacity as human beings to care about each other selflessly in thought and deed. Devoted to the Buddhist deity of compassion, the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, Infinite Compassion, is a collaborative exhibition featuring objects from the JMMTA, the Staten Island Museum, the Rubin Museum of Art, the Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College, and private collectors. The exhibition was guest curated by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetsky, PhD.


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    Old Visible Vaults
    Place: The San Diego Museum of Art - Balboa Park, San Diego, 1450 El Prado, California, USA
    Date: Nov 12, 2016 to Nov 12, 2019
    Detail: The Visible Vaults will recreate part of The San Diego Museum of Art’s most carefully guarded area, a place that is invisible to most visitors—the vaults where the thousands of works of art in our collection are stored.


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    Old Mastering Materials: Rare Objects from the IMA’s Asian Collection
    Place: Indianapolis Museum of Art - Indianapolis, 4000 Michigan Road, Indiana, USA
    Date: Nov 20, 2016 to Jul 15, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition features groupings of intricate artworks masterfully created from a wide array of materials including: wood, lacquer, ivory, bone, horn, paper, metal and stone. These materials were used to make objects that served a variety of purposes across multiple cultures. These intriguing treasures and curios herald from the IMA’s permanent collection, and many have not been on display for more than 50 years.

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    Old Color Across Asia
    Place: Ackland Art Museum - Chapel Hill, 101 S. Columbia Street, North Carolina, USA
    Date: Dec 21, 2016 to May 13, 2018
    Detail: Color Across Asia is part of a groundbreaking re-installation of the Ackland Art Museum’s Asian galleries, presenting the Museum’s acclaimed collection of art from across the continent.

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    Old Art of East Asia
    Place: The San Diego Museum of Art - Balboa Park, San Diego, 1450 El Prado, California, USA
    Date: Feb 07, 2017 to Dec 31, 2019
    Detail: Art of East Asia vividly animates the philosophical and creative traditions that inspired Asian luminaries and everyday people throughout China, Japan, and Korea.

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    Old Unexpected Light: Works by Young Il Ahn
    Place: LACMA - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., California, USA
    Date: Feb 25, 2017 to Aug 12, 2018
    Detail: Korean-American artist Young Il Ahn was born in 1934 in Gaeseong, historically known as the capital of the Goryeo dynasty (912–1392) and geographically located in North Korea today. While acknowledged as a child prodigy, Ahn carried out his most prolific work in Los Angeles since his arrival in the U.S. in 1966. Since then, Ahn’s works have consistently focused on his interest in the local surroundings rather than the country he left. This exhibition showcases many works from his best-known series, Water, which was inspired by a near-death incident on the Pacific Ocean in 1983, as well as his most recent works. The Water series marks a notable shift in Ahn’s style from semi abstraction to complete abstraction, which has continued to define his style to this day.

    This exhibition marks the first-ever introduction of a Korean-American artist at LACMA, highlighting the ever expanding diversity and realities within the ethnic Korean population in Los Angeles.


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    Old Teardrops that Wound
    Place: George Tsutakawa Art Gallery, Wing Luke Museum - Seattle, 719 South King Street, Washington, USA
    Date: May 12, 2017 to May 20, 2018
    Detail: Curator SuJ\'n Chon brings together six artists whose work transforms the imagery of war, revealing unexpected layers of meaning – and asks us to imagine a different outcome.


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    Old Circle of Animals / Zodiac Heads
    Place: The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art - Sarasota, 5401 Bay Shore Road, Florida, USA
    Date: Jun 09, 2017 to Jun 01, 2018
    Detail: The Ringling is pleased to announce the presentation of the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s 12 monumental bronze sculptures, Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads. A sculptor, photographer, installation artist, architect, and social activist, Ai is one of the most renowned artists working today.


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    Old Zhou Rong's Awn-2, Violet
    Place: Newark Museum - Newark, 49 Washington Street, New Jersey, USA
    Date: Jul 24, 2017 to Jul 31, 2018
    Detail: Zhou Rong\'s monumental sculpture, Awn-2 Violet, is now on view at the Newark Museum\'s sculpture garden. This time lapse video shows how the sculpture was installed at the Newark Museum by ArtCore. Other artists represented in the garden include David Smith, Tony Smith and Geroge Segal. The soft contours, strong color, and large scale of this abstract sculpture draw the eye—pointedly contrasting its environment. The slick reflective skin animates the surroundings making them part of the work while the convex and concave surfaces cast shifting shadows as sunlight moves across its planes. The work is one of a series (other editions of similar form with varying sizes and materials are available through the gallery) that plays with positive and negative space.

    Zhou Rong was born in Changzhou, Jiangsu Province and currently lives and works in Hangzhou, Beijing. She is an emerging contemporary sculptor and ink painter, and graduated with a degree in printmaking from the Chinese Academy of Art in Hangzhou in 2014. Like all FitzGerald Fine Arts artists, Zhou Rong’s work sits at the junction of traditional methods and themes and contemporary concerns and motifs.

    Unlike other artists on the FitzGerald Fine Arts’ roster, Zhou Rong does not engage in strictly figurative representations of this intersection of past and present. Instead, she forgoes traditional objectification of nature-derived subjects in favor of a conceptual dialect. Zhou Rong’s surrealist works probe both changing gender roles and the mass urbanization rapidly reshaping Mainland China. In her ominous monochrome ink paintings, negative space is given equal credence as defined silhouette – positioning a psychological tension between viewer and subject.

    Her sculptural pieces draw upon the same themes while leveraging surprising uses of negative and positive space to evoke the inherent difference and connection between sharp and soft, strong and tender, birth and death.


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    Old Streams and Mountains without End: Landscape Traditions of China
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, USA
    Date: Aug 26, 2017 to Jan 06, 2019
    Detail: Showcasing more than 120 Chinese landscape paintings in three rotations, the exhibition will offer gateways into the tradition, drawing out distinctions between types of landscape that may not be obvious at first glance. What initially appears to be a simple mountain dwelling, for example, is revealed to be the villa of the painter's friend, which encodes a wish for his happy retirement; what seems at first to be a simple study in dry brushwork turns out to be an homage to an old master, a sign of reverence for what had come before.


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    Old Black and White: Japanese Modern Art
    Place: Museum of Fine Arts - Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, Massachusetts, USA
    Date: Sep 30, 2017 to Jun 03, 2018
    Detail: Centered around a newly acquired, large-scale calligraphy by Inoue Yūichi (1916–85), this exhibition showcases a selection of avant-garde works in the monochrome aesthetic shared widely in Japan and beyond during the postwar period. This sensibility is rooted in Zen Buddhism, which values simplicity and austerity, and remains influential today. The works in the exhibition are the results of transnational exchanges between Japanese artists like Inoue and their American Expressionist contemporaries, including Franz Kline and Jackson Pollock, who drew inspiration from Asian calligraphy for their gestural paintings. Among the nine works on view are prints, ceramics and sculpture, primarily drawn from the MFA’s collection.


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    Old Ganesha: The Playful Protector
    Place: Denver Art Museum - Denver, 100 W 14th Avenue Pkwy, Colorado, USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2017 to Oct 28, 2018
    Detail: Ganesha: The Playful Protector is developed in collaboration with the National Museum of Cambodia in Phnom Penh, which is loaning a statue of Ganesha created in the 600 to 700s that is the centerpiece of the exhibition.

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    Old Arts of Asia
    Place: The Walters Art Museum - Baltimore, 600 N. Charles Street, Maryland, USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2017 to Sep 30, 2020
    Detail: Find time for tranquility and reflection in Arts of Asia, the Walters’ new installation of one of the most exceptional collections of Asian art in North America. The dramatic display offers a rich exploration of artistic traditions from diverse cultures and regions across India, Nepal, Tibet, China, Korea, Japan, Myanmar, Thailand, and Cambodia. The stunning array of 150 works spanning 2,000 years includes more than 30 objects that have never been on view. Visitors are invited to enjoy the stillness and serenity of these works of art and to share the experience of quiet contemplation that they inspire.


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    New Hard Bodies: Contemporary Japanese Lacquer Sculpture
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, USA
    Date: Oct 07, 2017 to Jun 24, 2018
    Detail: It’s an art nearly as old as civilization itself. Since the Neolithic era, artisans in East Asia have coated bowls, cups, boxes, baskets, and other utilitarian objects with a natural polymer distilled from the sap of the rhus verniciflua, known as the lacquer tree. Lacquerware was—and still is—prized for its sheen, a lustrous beauty that artists learned to accentuate over the centuries with inlaid gold, silver, mother-of-pearl, and other precious materials.

    Since the late 1980s, this tradition has been challenged. A small but enterprising circle of lacquer artists have pushed the medium in entirely new and dynamic directions by creating large-scale sculptures, works that are both conceptually innovative and superbly exploitive of lacquer’s natural virtues. Thirty works by 16 artists comprise the first-ever comprehensive exhibition of contemporary Japanese lacquer sculpture. They have all been drawn from the Clark Collections at Mia, the only collection in the world to feature this extraordinary new form.


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    Old Boundless Peaks: Ink Paintings by Minol Araki
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, Minnesota, USA
    Date: Oct 07, 2017 to Jun 24, 2018
    Detail: Renowned as an industrial designer, Minol Araki (1928–2010) was also a prolific painter with a firm grounding in East Asian painting traditions. Born in China to Japanese parents, and active professionally in New York and Taipei, Araki created an immense body of ink paintings that reimagined tradition and straddled East and West.

    This exhibition is organized around five mid-career, large-scale works—monumental compositions, each of which stretches more than 70 feet—depicting landscapes, dragons, snow monkeys, and lotus ponds. Each painting is complemented by early and late works that marry influences as disparate as the eccentric Chinese painter Bada Shanren (c. 1626–1705), the Lithuanian-American artist Ben Shahn (1898–1969), Araki’s mentor, the renowned Chinese traditionalist painter Zhang Daqian (1899–1983), and medieval Japanese Zen painters.


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    Old Subodh Gupta
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution - Washington, D.C., 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Oct 14, 2017 to Jun 24, 2018
    Detail: Internationally acclaimed artist Subodh Gupta transforms familiar household objects, such as stainless steel and brass vessels often found in India, into wondrous structures. The Freer|Sackler features the artist’s monumental installation Terminal. Composed of towers of brass containers connected by an intricate web of thread, Terminal converts the readymade into a glimmering landscape. Ranging from one to fifteen feet tall, the spires recall architectural features found on religious structures such as churches, temples, and mosques.

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    Old Resound: Ancient Bells of China
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, D.C., 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Oct 14, 2017 to Dec 31, 2019
    Detail: Bells were among the first metal objects created in China. Beginning over 3,500 years ago, small, primitive noisemakers grew into gongs and further evolved into sets of hand bells for playing melodies. Further, centuries of technological experimentation resulted in more sophisticated bells that produced two pitches when struck in different spots.

    Variations in size, shape, decoration, and sound also reveal regional differences across north and south China. By the late Bronze Age large sets of tuned bells were played in ensemble performances in both areas. Cast from bronze, these durable bells preserve valuable information about the character of early Chinese music.

    Today we can use technology to explore these ancient instruments and to explain their acoustical properties, but we know little about the sound of this early music. To bring the bells to life, we commissioned three composers to create soundscapes using the recorded tones of a 2,500-year-old bell set on display. Each of them also produced a video projection to interpret his composition with moving images that allow us to “see sound.”


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    Old Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution - Washington, D.C., 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Oct 14, 2017 to Oct 14, 2020
    Detail: Encounter Buddhist art through the lens of spiritual practice and the perspectives of practitioners. Drawing on the Freer|Sackler’s collections from across Asia, this exhibition expands the understanding of Buddhism in Asian art through both beautiful objects and immersive spaces. Visitors can step into a Tibetan Buddhist shrine, travel the Buddhist world with an eighth-century Korean monk, visit a Sri Lankan stupa, meet teachers and guardians, and discover multiple Buddhas and bodhisattvas. Encountering the Buddha illuminates the ways in which art and place embody and express the teachings of Buddhism.

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    Old Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, USA
    Date: Oct 21, 2017 to Jul 22, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition will explore how real and mythical animals—such as the dragon, unicorn, phoenix, lion, ox, and butterfly—are depicted on luxury materials of late imperial China. Presenting 20 textiles and 50 lacquers spanning several hundred years—from the 13th to the 19th century—the exhibition will highlight the imagery on a wide range of objects: dragon robes, rank badges, and tapestry panels for interior decoration, as well as many different types of lacquer vessels from imperial workshops. The objects are drawn exclusively from The Met collection, and some have not been on display for several decades.


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    Old A Passion for Jade: Heber Bishop and His Collection
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Oct 21, 2017 to Jul 22, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition presents a selection of the most refined works from the Bishop collection of jade, the most esteemed stone in China. The works on view represent the sophisticated art of Chinese lapidaries during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), as well as the highly accomplished works of Mogul Indian (1526–1857) craftsmen whose skill inspired their Chinese counterparts. Also on display are a set of Chinese lapidary tools and illustrations of jade workshops, which introduce viewers to the traditional method of working jade.

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    Old Power in Southeast Asia
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, D.C., 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Oct 21, 2017 to Nov 18, 2018
    Detail: Through a range of local styles, techniques, and materials, the artworks in this exhibition reveal understandings of power in Southeast Asia. Large and small objects from Cambodia, Indonesia, and Thailand are clustered to explore the powers of warfare, water, snakes, and the feminine. These themes are both culturally specific and universally resonant.

    During the first millennium CE, maritime Southeast Asia became a network of trading polities boasting cosmopolitan emporiums. Inland dynasties established urban capitals. Flourishing during the ninth through the fourteenth century, these cities towered with temples and supported sophisticated courtly cultures. Their rulers fostered innovative artistic and architectural creations that blended imported ideas with local traditions.

    Cities arose at the archaeological areas of Angkor (Cambodia), Prambanan and Majapahit (Indonesia), Bagan (Myanmar), and Si Thep (Thailand). In each place, Buddhist and Hindu schools from India gained traction. Deities including Bhairava, Agastya, and the goddess were worshiped, and potent symbols, such as water and snakes, served as markers of the divine.

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    Old Zheng Chongbin: Clusters of Memory
    Place: Asia Society Texas Center - Houston, 1370 Southmore Blvd. , Texas, USA
    Date: Oct 28, 2017 to Jul 08, 2018
    Detail: Artist Zheng Chongbin fuses western abstraction with the Chinese calligraphic tradition in works of ink and acrylic on paper, finding contemporary relevance from earlier forms of Asian ink art. Zheng’s works examine themes of time and memory, and their cumulative effects on both humanity and the natural world. In his first solo exhibition at a U.S. museum, Zheng will be presenting paintings and for the first time, a large, multiplanar video sculpture installation which responds to the unique architecture of Asia Society Texas Center as a larger macrocosm.


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    Old New Forms, New Voices: Japanese Ceramics from the Gitter-Yelen Collection
    Place: New Orleans Museum of Art - New Orleans, One Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, Louisiana, USA
    Date: Nov 04, 2017 to May 13, 2018
    Detail: Ceramics have been made in Japan for over 15,000 years. For the first time in over twenty years, NOMA will present an exhibition devoted to modern and contemporary ceramics. New Forms, New Voices: Japanese Ceramics from the Gitter-Yelen Collection will showcase selected works by masters of the medium.


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    New Miao Clothing and Jewelry from China
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, USA
    Date: Nov 04, 2017 to Jul 01, 2018
    Detail: One of the largest ethnic minorities in China, most Miao people live in the southern provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, and Yunnan. Like many cultures throughout Asia, Miao peoples employ textiles, clothing, and accessories to express their identity. For the Miao, elaborate festival costumes and silver adornments are the most important forms of visual art, and their embroidery and indigo-dyeing techniques are renowned. Clothing indicates the wearer’s age and marital status and marks important rites of passage. Traditional motifs record Miao history and beliefs, while decorative techniques, patterning, and stitches distinguish one group from another.

    This exhibition features nearly 50 examples from Mia’s collection of more than 1,200 textiles and 450 pieces of jewelry made in the last century by Miao artists.


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    Old Miao Clothing and Jewelry from China
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, Minnesota, USA
    Date: Nov 04, 2017 to Jul 01, 2018
    Detail: One of the largest ethnic minorities in China, most Miao people live in the southern provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, and Yunnan. Like many cultures throughout Asia, Miao peoples employ textiles, clothing, and accessories to express their identity. For the Miao, elaborate festival costumes and silver adornments are the most important forms of visual art, and their embroidery and indigo-dyeing techniques are renowned. Clothing indicates the wearer’s age and marital status and marks important rites of passage. Traditional motifs record Miao history and beliefs, while decorative techniques, patterning, and stitches distinguish one group from another.

    This exhibition features nearly 50 examples from Mia’s collection of more than 1,200 textiles and 450 pieces of jewelry made in the last century by Miao artists.

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    Old Talents and Beauties: Art of Women in Japan
    Place: Seattle Art Museum - Seattle, 1300 First Avenue, Washington, USA
    Date: Nov 04, 2017 to Jul 15, 2018
    Detail: Women have been well represented as a subject in Japanese art: they are portrayed for their beauty; for their talents in literature, music, and dance; and sometimes as female deities. While most of the women are shown from the perspective of a male gaze, these representations also provide us with a glimpse of the dynamic aspects of women’s lives.

    The earliest and most influential work of Japanese literature—The Tale of Genji—was written in the early 11th century by a woman known as Lady Murasaki Shikibu. The tale has captured the imagination of many with its accounts of the intrigues of courtly life and has had a profound impact on visual culture in Japan for more than a thousand years. On view in this gallery are examples of Genji pictures in various formats—folding screens, hanging scrolls, album leaves—all of which attest to the lasting appeal of the saga. Also on view are paintings of working women, as well as prints, kimono, and lacquerware that showcase women’s self-fashioning in daily life.


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    Old Sacred Spaces
    Place: Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Nov 17, 2017 to Oct 15, 2018
    Detail: What spaces are sacred to you? Some sacred spaces are public, like a religious holy site or your community’s house of worship. Others are private, like a personal sanctuary for finding peace and concentration. Regardless of where they are or what they look like, the relationships we build with these sacred spaces inform how we think about ourselves and relate to the rest of the world.

    The Rubin’s ongoing exhibition Sacred Spaces invites visitors to reflect on devotional activities in awe-inspiring places. This iteration, The Road To…, focuses on the act and action of pilgrimage for the benefit of one’s future self.


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    Old Long Nineteen Century in Japanese Woodblock Prints
    Place: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art - Eugene, 1430 Johnson Lane, Oregon, USA
    Date: Nov 18, 2017 to Jul 01, 2018
    Detail: The nineteenth century was a turning point in Japanese history, commonly associated with the transition from pre-modern feudal society of the Edo period (1615-1868) to the Western-style modernity of the Meiji Era (1868-1912). In the past, 1868 was considered to be a rupture, an overnight departure from the Japanese/East Asian way of life in all aspects of culture and society, after the forcible opening of Japan by the American Commodore Matthew Perry’s “Black Ships” a decade earlier. However, recent studies have shown that the cultural shift from Edo to Meiji was more gradual.


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    Old Warriors in World War I: Sikh Art and Heritage
    Place: Phoenix Art Museum, The Kaur and Singh Sikh Gallery - Phoenix, 1625 N. Central Avenue, Arizona, USA
    Date: Nov 18, 2017 to Dec 02, 2018
    Detail: To commemorate the 100-year anniversary of the armistice treaty that ended World War I, Warriors in World War I: Sikh Art and Heritage will present a selection of photographs, lithographs, postcards and military medals that document the crucial presence of Sikh warriors in the British Indian Army. Though Sikhs constituted only 1% of the Indian population at the time, they counted for more than 20% of the Indian army, which fought for the British Empire in Egypt, Palestine, Mesopotamia, Turkey, France, Germany, Belgium and Britain. Their valor was recognized by many, including historian F. Yeats Brown, who said, “…[Sikh warriors] live up to their title of the Singh, which means lion.”

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    Old Reflection and Enlightenment: Chinese Buddhist Gilt Bronzes from the Jane and Leopold Swergold Collection
    Place: The Museum of Fine Arts - Houston, 1001 Bissonnet Street, Texas, USA
    Date: Nov 29, 2017 to May 13, 2018
    Detail: Reflection and Enlightenment features a selection of Chinese Buddhist gilt bronzes from the collection of Jane and Leopold Swergold.


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    Old Highlights from the Asian Collection
    Place: Harn Museum of Art - Gainesville, 3259 Hull Road, Florida, USA
    Date: Dec 05, 2017 to Jun 03, 2018
    Detail: ABC: Art by the Letter highlights the Harn’s diverse collecting areas through an alphabetical exploration of subject matter, medium and formal elements. Favorite and lesser-known works illustrate the visual and phonetic connections to the English language and alphabet. From alligator to zig-zag, this exhibition will delight children, families and the young-at-heart.

    Artists represented in the exhibition include Milton Avery, Mathew Brady, Utagawa Hiroshige, Jacob Lawrence, Louise Nevelson, Georgia O’Keeffe, Pablo Picasso, Jamini Roy, and Jerry Uelsmann, among others. Forty-six works in a variety of media represent the twenty-six letters in the alphabet and are drawn from all Harn collecting areas--African, Asian, Modern, Contemporary, Photography, Ancient American, Oceanic, and Prints & Drawings before 1850.


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    Old Traces of the Past and Future: Fu Shen’s Paintings and Calligraphy
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, California, USA
    Date: Dec 05, 2017 to Sep 02, 2018
    Detail: Fu Shen works at the intersection of landscape, calligraphy, poetry, ceramics and even memoir. A scholar, teacher and curator, Fu has realized his own distinct artistic voice after decades of study. Celebrated for bringing out the painterly quality of calligraphy and weaving his own narrative into ethereal landscapes, Fu both honors and extends the tradition of Chinese ink art.


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    Old Winds From Fusang: Mexico And China In The Twentieth Century
    Place: USC Pacific Asia Museum - Pasadena, 46 N Los Robles Ave, California, USA
    Date: Dec 08, 2017 to Jun 01, 2018
    Detail: Artist collection exhibit showcasing the relationship between Mexican and Chinese artists.

    Winds from Fusang: Mexico and China in the Twentieth Century is the first major exhibition on the heretofore unexamined influence of Mexican art and artists on the development of art in China in the twentieth century. The exhibition, its accompanying publication, and dynamic public programs will present the trans-Pacific ties between the creative communities of Mexico and China in the last century.

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    Old Secrets of the Lacquer Buddha
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, D.C., 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Dec 09, 2017 to Jun 10, 2018
    Detail: Secrets of the Lacquer Buddha unites the only sixth- and seventh-century, life-size Chinese lacquer buddha sculptures known: one from the Walters Art Museum, one from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and one from the Freer Gallery of Art. They have never been exhibited together before.

    The exhibition explores how the sculptures were made, giving new insights into these deceptively simple objects. It also highlights how science can contribute to understanding art. The Freer|Sackler Department of Conservation and Scientific Research’s experts used specialized equipment and new methods to analyze the sculptures, exposing microscopic details. Find out what tree species the lacquer came from, what type of burnt bone was mixed in, and other unexpected discoveries.

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    Old Wu Bin: Ten Views of a Lingbi Stone
    Place: LACMA - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., California, USA
    Date: Dec 10, 2017 to Jun 24, 2018
    Detail: In ancient China strange and marvelous stones were valued for their beauty and as reflections of the hidden structures underlying the universe. Stones were seen as fluid and dynamic, constantly changing, and capable of magical transformations. Certain stones were believed to be able to speak, to emit clouds and rain, to predict the weather, to move about of their own accord, and to heal. Fantastic stones were perceived as mountains in miniature, imbued with the same primordial energies that made up peaks sacred to both Daoist and Buddhist traditions. Like the human body, stones were believed to be born, to live, and to die, just as were mountains themselves.

    The exhibition focuses on the most extraordinary painting of a stone ever created in China: Wu Bin’s Ten Views of a Lingbi Stone (1610), a Ming dynasty handscroll comprising 10 separate views of a single stone from the famous site of Lingbi, Anhui Province. Also including superb examples of Lingbi and Taihu stones and contemporary Chinese ink paintings depicting stones, this exhibition explores the history of collecting strange stones in China and the relationship between stones, Daoist cosmology, and classical Chinese poetry.


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    Old Crowns of the Vajra Masters: Ritual Art of Nepal
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Dec 16, 2017 to Dec 16, 2018
    Detail: The single most potent symbol of Buddhist ritual as performed in Nepal is the Vajracarya priest\'s crown. Five examples presented in this exhibition will create a cosmic field into which viewers will enter, encircled by paintings of ritual performance. The exhibition is occasioned by the recent acquisition of a superb early Vajracarya crown dating to the 13th or early 14th century; this will be joined by an 18th-century crown already in the collection and two others recently discovered in the Department of Arms and Armor. Bronze and wooden ritual utensils, Nepalese cloth paintings, and archival photographs of ritual enactment will complete the exhibition.


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    Old A Century of Asian Art at Oberlin: Japanese Prints
    Place: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College - Oberlin, 87 North Main Street, Ohio, USA
    Date: Dec 19, 2017 to May 27, 2018
    Detail: By happy coincidence, major donations of Japanese prints to the AMAM have roughly paralleled major movements in Japanese printmaking from the 18th through the 20th centuries. This exhibition presents works by master printmakers from a variety of periods—a dual chronicle of this printmaking history and the growth of the museum’s collection.

    In 1950, the Allen received from Mary A. Ainsworth (OC 1889) some 1,500 prints of the Edo period (1603–1868) that depict the “floating world” of 18th- and 19th-century pleasure districts. In the 1980s, Paul F. Walter (OC ’57) began donating limited-edition surimono prints of the Edo period, as well as late-19th-century prints from the Meiji period (1868–1912). In 1997, the AMAM received 20th-century landscape prints in the shin-hanga (new prints) style from Owen T. Jones (OC ’29) and his wife, Margaret. Later that year, Sarah G. Epstein (OC ’48) added other shin-hanga prints, as well works from the sōsaku-hanga (creative prints) movement in which individual artists did all of the woodblock carving and printing themselves. The most recent major gift came in 1999, when Dr. Sanford Palay (OC ’40) donated prints made from the 1960s to the 90s, including etchings and lithographs. Due to the generosity of these and other donors, this exhibition offers a look at Japanese society from the time of its isolation in the 18th century up until the late 20th century.


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    Old Mizusashi: Japanese Water Jars from the Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz Collection
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, Minnesota, USA
    Date: Dec 23, 2017 to May 13, 2018
    Detail:mizusashi is a utensil used in the Japanese tea ceremony, a tradition with medieval origins that is still widely practiced today. In a tea gathering, a host prepares bowls of tea by whisking together powdered green tea and hot water drawn from a kettle. The mizusashi, typically an earthenware or stoneware jar, holds the water used to replenish the kettle and rinse the bowls. The first utensil to enter the room and the last to leave, the mizusashiis a locational and aesthetic anchor for the gathering and can take a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and appearances. This selection of 20th- and 21st-century mizusashi highlights two important trends—the perpetuation of longstanding tea traditions alongside the artistry and technical excellence that define modern Japanese ceramics. This exhibition is complemented by a selection of Japanese tea utensils from the turn of the 17th century, on view in Gallery 224


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    Old In Focus: Contemporary Japan
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, Minnesota, USA
    Date: Dec 23, 2017 to Aug 12, 2018
    Detail: Since the early 1990s, Japan has endured an ongoing economic recession and a series of natural disasters, including devastating earthquakes and tsunami. Artists have responded by co-opting or critiquing rampant consumerism and exploring identity and memory. All the while, they maintain a deep skepticism as to what the future may hold. Some have embraced the fantasy worlds found in manga (comic books) and anime (animation) as a form of escape. Others have turned their attention to the mundane aspects of everyday life, often using found materials readily at hand to ground their work in lived experience.



    This “In Focus” exhibition features works created after 2000, including loans and recent acquisitions by Kei Imazu, Chihiro Mori, Yasumasa Morimura, Takashi Murakami, Shinro Ohtake, as well as a Micropop Cinema screening of video work by Ryoko Aoki and Zon Ito, Taro Izumi, Chihiro Mori, and Koki Tanaka.

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    Old Religion and Ritual
    Place: Ackland Art Museum - Chapel Hill, 101 S. Columbia Street, North Carolina, USA
    Date: Jan 03, 2018 to May 13, 2018
    Detail: Asia is the birthplace of many of the world’s major systems of belief, and reflects the religious diversity of the planet. This installation presents the deities and artistic traditions of the world’s most populous continent, representing Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and more.

    Religion and Ritual is part of a groundbreaking re-installation of the Ackland Art Museum’s Asian galleries, presenting the Museum’s acclaimed collection of art from across the continent.

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    Old Celebrating the Year of the Dog
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jan 19, 2018 to Jul 04, 2018
    Detail: The traditional East Asian lunar calendar consists of a repeating 12-year cycle, with each year corresponding to one of the 12 animals in the East Asian zodiac (rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, ram, monkey, rooster, dog, and pig). These animals were first associated with the lunar calendar in China in the third century B.C., becoming firmly established by the first century. Each animal is believed to embody certain traits expressed in the character of the people born in that year. This Lunar New Year, which begins on February 16, 2018, is the Year of the Dog. People born in this year are thought to be active, loyal, and vigilant.

    Commonly known as \"man\'s best friend,\" the dog, as one of the earliest domesticated animals, has long performed many essential tasks, including hunting, herding, pulling loads, protection, and companionship. Archaeological evidence indicates that dogs were buried to accompany the deceased as early as in China\'s Shang dynasty (ca. 1500–1046 B.C.). By the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 220), dogs were frequently represented in painting and metalwork, as well as in pottery tomb figures, and they remained a popular motif across all media for two millennia.

    To celebrate the Year of the Dog, this exhibition will present a selection of remarkable works, exclusively from The Met collection, that illustrate the animal\'s close association with Chinese daily life.


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    Old Earthly Splendor: Korean Ceramics from the Collection
    Place: The Crow Collection - Dallas, 2010 Flora Street, Texas, USA
    Date: Jan 20, 2018 to Sep 09, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition pairs outstanding examples of contemporary and historical Korean ceramics from the museum’s permanent collection to highlight the material, aesthetic, stylistic, and technical developments that has taken place throughout history.


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    Old A Queen's Treasure from Versailles: Marie-Antoinette's Japanese Lacquer
    Place: The Getty Center - Los Angeles, 1200 Getty Center Drive, California, USA
    Date: Jan 23, 2018 to Jan 06, 2019
    Detail: An exhibition showcasing Japanese lacquer from the private collection of the French queen Marie-Antoinette. Her collection of small lacquer boxes was one of the finest in Europe, and she considered it to be among her most cherished possessions. The elaborate works reveal the queen\'s personal taste and demonstrate the high level of achievement attained by Japanese lacquer artists during the 17th and 18th centuries.

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    Old Debating Art: Chinese Intellectuals at the Crossroads
    Place: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University - Ithaca, 114 Central Avenue, New York, USA
    Date: Feb 02, 2018 to Jul 08, 2018
    Detail: Paintings and calligraphy by leading Chinese intellectuals engaged in political discussion through art during the early twentieth century, including work by Hu Shih, a student at Cornell from 1910 to 1914.


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    Old Chitra Ganesh
    Place: Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th Street, USA
    Date: Feb 02, 2018 to Nov 04, 2018
    Detail: The mudra known as the scorpion gesture is said to have unlimited power and potential for transformation. Your presence will transform the Rubin galleries in Chitra Ganesh’s new series The Scorpion Gesture, causing her large-scale animations to appear as if by magic when you walk by select artworks. Ganesh has created five animated artistic “interventions” inspired by pieces in Gateway to Himalayan Art and Masterworks, using the figures of Padmasambhava, known as the Second Buddha, and Maitreya, the Future Buddha, as points of departure. The animations build on Ganesh’s longstanding investigation of mythology, imagery, and narrative in her multidisciplinary practice, integrating her drawings with elements from the Rubin’s collection. Developed with and animated by the STUDIO.


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    Old The Second Buddha: Master of Time
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Feb 02, 2018 to Jan 07, 2019
    Detail: In 2018, the future will be both present and projected from the past at the Rubin Museum of Art, with a new exhibition that will tell the story of the legendary Indian master Padmasambhava. Celebrated by Tibetans as “The Second Buddha,” Padmasambhava, the Lotus Born, is believed to have been instrumental in converting the land and people of Tibet to Buddhism. His legends carry universal relevance about triumph over obstacles, the power of human emotions, transformation, impermanence, achieving liberation from life and death, and notions of time — all of which transcend specific cultures and eras.

    The Second Buddha will bring together 40 works of art from the 13th to 20th centuries with interactive technology. Central to the exhibition will be themes of the interconnected nature of past and future as the basis for constructing identity and projecting teachings into the future. It is said that in the past Padmasambhava concealed his teachings, known as Treasure Teachings, throughout the Tibetan landscape to be discovered by foretold disciples at opportune times in the future. To parallel such discoveries, visitors will engage with select objects to reveal their hidden meaning and content. As one of the methods for revealing that which is hidden, visitors will use Augmented Reality (AR) tablets. The exhibition will also be activated by other interactive technology and performances, which will bring the narratives to life and let visitors consider mechanisms of storytelling that touch on the themes of the exhibition, the past, the present, and ways of enabling the future.


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    Old Power and Beauty in China’s Last Dynasty
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, Minnesota, USA
    Date: Feb 03, 2018 to May 27, 2018
    Detail: The arts of the Chinese Qing court rivaled that of Europe’s great kingdoms. This opulence served to affirm imperial power and prestige, and also as stagecraft for the emperor’s leading role as “son of heaven.” “Power and Beauty in China’s Last Dynasty” presents treasures from the museum’s renowned collection of Chinese art, including rare court costumes, jades, lacquers, paintings, and sculpture.


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    Old Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Feb 07, 2018 to May 20, 2018
    Detail: The Diamond Mountains—perhaps the most famous and emotionally resonant site on the Korean peninsula—is the theme of this international loan exhibition. Though the region has inspired cultural pride since ancient times, its location in what is today North Korea has kept it largely inaccessible in modern times. Featuring nearly 30 works—from delicately painted scrolls and screens to monumental modern and contemporary art—the exhibition will present the visual imagery of this iconic site from the 18th century to the present. Among the highlights is a designated Treasure from the National Museum of Korea: an album by Jeong Seon (1676–1759), who revolutionized Korean painting. Most of the objects on view have never before been displayed in the United States.


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    Old Art Of The Mountain: Through The Chinese Photographer’s Lens
    Place: China Institute - New York, 100 Washington Street, USA
    Date: Feb 08, 2018 to Dec 02, 2018
    Detail: Mountains, in Chinese legends, are the pillars that hold up the sky. Mountains were seen as places that nurture life. Their veneration took the form of rituals, retreat from social society, and aesthetic appreciation through the art of their vast beauty – some of the many ways that nature played and continues to play a defining role in Chinese culture. The exhibition, consisting of three sections with over 70 photographs by more than 20 contemporary photographers, will present the geography, history, culture, life, and art that is associated with or derived from mountains. The Lofty Mountains: The Famous Mountains of China will introduce the geography, history, legends, and cultures that are associated with famous Chinese mountains; The Pure Sound of Landscape: The Mountains and Chinese Landscape Aesthetic will introduce the renowned Chinese landscape painting aesthetic and how it influenced contemporary photography; and The New Landscape Photography will showcase artists using photography and post-photographic visual effects to express their thoughts on the role of mountains in society.

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    Old A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Feb 10, 2018 to Nov 11, 2018
    Detail: Anxiety and hope are often defined by a moment that has yet to arrive. How often do we memorialize our hopes and anxieties and consider their relationship to the future? A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful is an opportunity to express your apprehensions and expectations for tomorrow, contemplate your sense of the future, and engage with the viewpoints of others.

    Inspired by Tibetan prayer flags and the anonymity of public spaces, artist Candy Chang and writer James A. Reeves ask Rubin visitors to engage with their community by sharing their anxieties or hopes on a card. At a glance, passersby in our Spiral Lobby will be able to glean the prevailing mood of respondents and, drawing closer, explore hundreds of individual meditations that range from personal, local, and specific statements to political, theoretical, and spiritual reflections.


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    Old Japan’s Global Baroque, 1550–1650
    Place: The Yale University Art Gallery - New Haven, 1111 Chapel Street (at York Street), Connecticut, USA
    Date: Feb 23, 2018 to May 21, 2018
    Detail: While politically tumultuous, the 16th and 17th centuries in Japan were also marked by vibrancy and innovation in the visual and literary arts. A chance landing by a few Portuguese sailors on the southern coast of Japan in 1543 fostered the nation’s participation in the burgeoning global trade of textiles, porcelains, lacquers, and other luxuries. This focused exhibition includes important loans alongside works from the Gallery’s collection and explores the critical role that imported goods played in Japanese culture during this momentous period. In addition to spectacular screens showing the arrival of foreign ships and their crews, the exhibition also features Japanese lacquers produced for domestic use and export, Chinese ceramics made for the Japanese market, and Persian and Indian trade textiles, some of which were refashioned into Japanese clothing.


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    Old Fabricating Power with Balinese Textiles
    Place: Bard Graduate Center Gallery - New York, 18 West 86th Street, USA
    Date: Feb 23, 2018 to Jul 08, 2018
    Detail: Western scholars and artists converged on the tropical island of Bali, Indonesia, in the first half of the 20th century attracted by its unique culture and vibrant artistic practices. This exhibition considers the making and use of textiles as ceremonial objects that operate within a unique Balinese Hindu cosmology while exploring the role of textiles as symbols of cultural resilience and continuity. On view will be exquisite and rare pieces assembled from collections in the United States, including examples from the American Museum of Natural History that were collected by anthropologists Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson during their fieldwork in Bali. Deriving their aesthetic and ritual powers from techniques of fabrication and use in various lifecycle ceremonies, these textiles also serve as records of an important period in Balinese history. Drawing on information from the 1930s and recent research, the exhibition presents an overview of Balinese textiles and encourages visitors to consider the value of these objects as they are made and used today.


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    Old The Future is Fluid
    Place: Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Feb 23, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
    Detail: Step into a world where past, present, and future exist all at once. At the Rubin in 2018, we’re bringing together a full year of exhibitions, talks, programs, and experiences that unpack our commonly held ideas about the future.

    By examining various perspectives—from an eighth-century Buddhist master to Einstein to contemporary artists—we invite you to consider a future that isn’t fixed but fluid.

    Are you ready to form a new relationship with the future? Take a look at what’s on, and join us this year at the Rubin.


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    Old A Lost Future
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Feb 23, 2018 to Jan 28, 2019
    Detail: In the Otolith Group’s transtemporal consideration of modernity in urban India, the narrator questions, “Why do Indian artists produce so little science fiction?” The reply: “Satyajit Ray’s film The Alien would have rendered this question void. It is this emptiness that allows a nostalgia for a lost future.”

    The three-part exhibition A Lost Future challenges existing histories and speculative futures across cultures and in Bengal—a culturally rich region divided between present-day India and Bangladesh. The three contemporary artists featured in the exhibition—Shezad Dawood, the Otolith Group, and Matti Braun—engage an evocative range of mediums that spans virtual reality to an immersive lake along with painting, film, sculpture, and photography. Through rich storytelling, A Lost Future explores themes of virtuality, modernity, and world-making in ways that are universal as well as interconnected and specific to this region.

    A Lost Future presents still works by all three artists throughout the run, while the central cove will rotate to highlight each one individually.

    A Lost Future: Shezad Dawood (February 23–May 18, 2018) features an interactive virtual reality experience of the Indian hill station Kalimpong, linking a haunting nostalgic portal to a future alternative reality. Expanding on some of the sites and stories in Dawood’s paintings and sculptures on view, the virtual reality work allows visitors to travel from the mythic Himalayan Hotel into the mountains, an adjacent monastery, and beyond.

    A Lost Future: The Otolith Group (June 1–September 17, 2018) presents the world premiere of the Turner Prize–nominated filmmakers’ new work on the past, present, and future of the Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore’s radical, pioneering art school Kala Bhavan in Santiniketan, as well as a selection of earlier films, including their “premake” of Ray’s unmade film The Alien, titled Otolith III (2009).

    A Lost Future: Matti Braun (October 5, 2018–January 28, 2019)transforms the central gallery into an immersive lake that visitors can traverse. R.T., S.R., V.S. (2003–present) references the lotus pond in the first scene of Ray’s The Alien,in which a friendly, catalytic alien from another time and place lands in a village. It also draws inspiration from the first scene in Steven Spielberg’s E.T., which may have been directly influenced by Ray’s script.


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    Old Unknown Tibet: The Tucci Expeditions and Buddhist Painting
    Place: Asia Society - New York, 725 Park Avenue, USA
    Date: Feb 27, 2018 to May 20, 2018
    Detail: Recently restored Tibetan paintings collected by Giuseppe Tucci during his expeditions to Tibet and now in the collection of the MNAO, Rome.


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    Old The Poetry of Nature: Edo Paintings from the Fishbein-Bender Collection
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Feb 27, 2018 to Jan 21, 2019
    Detail: Painting blossomed in Japan during the Edo period (1615–1868), as artists daringly experimented with conventional styles. In this exhibition, more than 40 examples of Edo-period paintings from the collection of Estelle P. Bender and her late husband T. Richard Fishbein—mostly gifts and promised gifts to The Met—will help trace the development of the major schools and movements of this fascinating era. Contemporary Japanese ceramics will be juxtaposed with Edo-period paintings, while works in various formats and media from The Met collection will provide context. The celebration of the natural world will serve as a unifying theme, and the intertwined relationship between poetry and the pictorial arts—so fundamental to Japanese tradition—will be a particular focus of the exhibition.


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    Old Modernism on the Ganges: Raghubir Singh Photographs
    Place: The Museum of Fine Arts - Houston, 1001 Bissonnet Street, Texas, USA
    Date: Mar 03, 2018 to Jun 03, 2018
    Detail: Raghubir Singh pushed the genre of street photography into a world of living color. Born in Jaipur, Rajasthan, to an aristocratic Indian family, Singh (1942–1999) lived in Hong Kong, Paris, London, and New York—but his eye was perpetually drawn back to his native India.

    The retrospective Modernism on the Ganges: Raghubir Singh Photographs traces the full trajectory of the visionary photographer’s career through nearly 90 images, from his early work in the late 1960s to his last, unpublished projects of the late 1990s. After starting his career as a photojournalist, Singh soon began to pursue an artistic vision that stood, as he put it, “on the Ganges side of Modernism.”


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    Old From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection
    Place: Kimbell Art Museum - Fort Worth, 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Texas, USA
    Date: Mar 04, 2018 to Aug 19, 2018
    Detail: When Americans Samuel and Myrna Myers visited Paris in the mid-1960s, they became so enamored with the city that they decided to make their home there. This was where they built an extraordinary collection that until now has never been exhibited publicly. Over the course of more than 40 years, the Myers assembled some 5,000 works of art that, together, offer a very personal vision of the world of Asian art. This exhibition will present over 400 objects selected from this remarkable collection, with works representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Vietnam.

    The exhibition revolves around a passion for Asia and covers a broad historical range, from the Neolithic era to modern times. The objects are also highly varied in nature, from porcelain, ivory, and precious stones such as jade and rock crystal to Buddhist art and textiles and stunning costumes from Central Asia, Tibet, China and Japan. Each treasure is exceptional in its shape, rarity, quality, function or inherent message. The exhibition recounts fascinating historical events through themes such as the symbolism of Chinese jade, the trade in blue-and-white porcelain, Buddhism, Noh theater, the Japanese samurai, the tea ceremony, the art of writing and the place of women. The astonishing array of outstanding works of art in the Myers collection is testimony to Asia\'s rich cultural heritage and unique customs and offers a broad panorama of Asian history in all its beauty and diversity.


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    Old Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India
    Place: The Museum of Fine Arts - Houston, 1001 Bissonnet Street, Texas, USA
    Date: Mar 04, 2018 to Aug 19, 2018
    Detail: Centuries of royal treasures from India come to the United States for the first time in an epic presentation. Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India features masterpieces and relics—never before seen beyond palace walls—that illustrate the history and artistic legacy of the Rathore dynasty.


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    Old A Giant Leap: The Transformation of Hasegawa Tōhaku
    Place: Japan Society - New York, 333 East 47th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 09, 2018 to May 06, 2018
    Detail: Commemorating Japan Society’s 110th anniversary, this special exhibition celebrates the life and legacy of Hasegawa Tōhaku (1539–1610), founder of the Hasegawa school of painting and one of 16th-century Japan’s leading artistic innovators. For the first time in the U.S., visitors will have an unparalleled opportunity to experience more than ten of Tōhaku’s most celebrated works in a single space, including four Important Cultural Properties from Japanese collections.

    A Giant Leap traces the artist’s evolution from a painter of provincial origins to a master favored by samurai and other cultural luminaries. A special focus will be a screen from a private collection, depicting flowers and birds of spring and summer, believed to mark the pivotal moment of Tōhaku\'s transformation. Owing to their rarity and in order to preserve their remarkable condition, the screens and scroll paintings will be displayed in two rotations, March 9—April 8, 2018 and April 12—May 6, 2018.


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    Old Divine Bodies
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, California, USA
    Date: Mar 09, 2018 to Jul 29, 2018
    Detail: Bringing historical paintings and sculptures from mainly Hindu and Buddhist traditions together with contemporary photo-based work, Divine Bodies invites you to ponder the power of transformation, the possibility of transcendence and the relationship of the body to the cosmos.


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    Old Dramatic Threads: Textiles of Asia
    Place: Newark Museum - Newark, 49 Washington Street, New Jersey, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2018 to Feb 15, 2019
    Detail: Featuring theatrical and political costumes as well as architectural and decorative textiles from diverse areas of Asia — Dramatic Threads: Textiles of Asia will showcase works that display a wide range of techniques. Different embroidery stitches may be read like a signature to unveil where they were made. Woven textiles reflect diverse making methods ranging from virtuoso brocades and slit-tapestry to twill and plain weaves. The materials used—gold, silk, wool, cotton—all unlock regional access to resources weighing local production compared to luxury imports. Cultural preferences for specific color palates and subject matter intertwine with these resources and underscore distinct regional histories.

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    Old Divine Feminine: New Masterpieces from Nepal
    Place: Tibet House US - New York, 22 West 15th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2018 to May 11, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition presents new work from the Dharmapala Thangka Center in Nepal. It celebrates the significant and specific roles of female icons in the liberation and enlightenment of sentient beings.

    In Tibetan Buddhism, a female Buddha is considered to be the mother of all Buddhas and sentient beings. In Tantrism, female buddhas are important aspects of the enlightenment practice known as Atti yoga (maha yoga). In Tibetan art, these female icons and figures are depicted as buddhas, bodhisattvas, historical figures such as lineage founders, and also yidams and dharma protectors in peaceful, semi-wrathful or wrathful forms. This is the second showing of works from the Dharmapala Center at the Tibet House US Gallery.

    Master artist Karsang Lama from the Dharmapala Center is a national treasure in Nepal and a world renowned painter of traditional tangkas. His work appears in monasteries and museums in Asia, Europe and the United States. The Dharmapala Thangka Center promotes the Himalayan Buddhist art and tradition, and is affiliated with a monastic tradition of the northern Buddhist artisans of Tibet and Nepal. The Center has trained hundreds of Tangka artists over three decades.


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    Old Vanishing Traditions: Textiles And Treasures From Southwest China
    Place: The George Washington University Museum - Washington, 701 21st Street, NW, USA
    Date: Mar 17, 2018 to Jul 09, 2018
    Detail: For centuries, minority cultures in southwest China have donned elaborate textiles, jewelry, and accessories for community celebrations. Dazzling festival costumes new to the museum’s collections explore traditions now endangered by modernization.


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    Old Binding the Clouds: The Art of Central Asian Ikat
    Place: The George Washington University Museum - Washington, 701 21st Street, NW, USA
    Date: Mar 17, 2018 to Jul 19, 2018
    Detail: Across Central Asia, oasis towns were once awash with the rainbow colors of ikat fabrics. Through exceptional artworks recently donated to the museum, this exhibition focuses on the sophisticated art of dyeing known in this region as abrband (binding the clouds).


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    Old Channeling Immortality: Chinese Scholars’ Rocks
    Place: Norton Museum of Art - West Palm Beach, 1451 S. Olive Avenue, Florida, USA
    Date: Mar 22, 2018 to May 06, 2018
    Detail: For centuries, Chinese scholars have believed that cosmic energy coalesces into fantastic-looking rocks, and that longevity and quietude are achieved through the love of such rocks. Large enough to be displayed in gardens or small enough to be set on a desk, this exhibition features striking examples of these rocks as well as paintings and other related works of art.


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    Old To Dye For: Ikats from Central Asia
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Mar 24, 2018 to Jul 29, 2018
    Detail: With their brilliant designs, ikats are among the most distinct fabrics produced in Central Asia. The name, derived from the Malaysian word for “to tie,” refers to the distinct technique of making these textiles: bundles of threads are painstakingly patterned by repeated binding and dyeing before being woven. In present-day Uzbekistan and the Fergana Valley, the fabric is known as abri (cloud) and the technique as abrbandi (tying clouds), referring to the fluid yet bold motifs in bright colors.


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    Old Chinese Buddhist Art, 10th–15th Centuries
    Place: Saint Louis Art Museum - St. Louis, 1 Fine Arts, Missouri, USA
    Date: Mar 30, 2018 to Aug 30, 2018
    Detail: In the centuries after Buddhism was introduced to China in the early part of the Han dynasty (AD 25–220), the style of Chinese Buddhist art developed its own unique characteristics. Spanning nearly 600 years—from the Five Dynasties (907–960) to the early part of the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644)—Chinese Buddhist Art, 10th–15th Centuries explores this evolution with rarely exhibited works from the Museum’s collection that depict significant Buddhist subjects, including bodhisattvas, arhats, and lotuses.


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    Old Imperfectly Beautiful: Inventing Japanese Ceramic Style
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Holding a bowl to drink freshly whisked green tea—this is the central experience of the Japanese tea ceremony (chanoyu). Until the late sixteenth century, Japanese tea drinkers viewed Chinese ceramics as the ideal: standardized, symmetrical, and impeccably glazed. But as the innovators of chanoyu began to emphasize individuality, they turned to local potters for fresh interpretations of tea ceramics. New traditions were born.

    As taste and opportunity converged, chanoyu participants and potters collaborated on creating a new kind of tea ceramic. Turning away from the impersonal, wheel-thrown form, they favored bowls that looked handmade. They sought vessels that communicated the feel of the potter’s hands on the soft clay and the fire’s kiss on the flowing glaze. Such bowls conveyed a message from the maker to the user through sight and, especially, touch. These early experiments sparked an approach to clay that still inspires many potters and tea drinkers today.


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    Old In the Shadow of an Apocalypse: Buddhist Art in Japan
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Japan was a nation under siege in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, living out an apocalypse foretold in Buddhist teachings. The Mongols swept across Asia and, by the late 1200s, attempted to invade Japan. Natural calamities and plagues underscored the sense of end times.

    In this tumultuous period, Japanese Buddhists turned to their faith for protection, compassion, and order. An explosion of iconography responded to those needs. Whether painted or sculpted, Buddhist works reassured believers with visions of compassionate protectors and fierce guardians. New production techniques offered such images an intensely heightened realism.

    Mandalas, diagrams that depict an invisible yet foundational spiritual order, offered a sense of structure amid chaos. The most familiar examples are two-dimensional compositions of concentric squares, circles, or other patterns. Sculptures were arranged in similar patterns to create three-dimensional mandalas of almost theme park-like proportions. Several works in this exhibition were once part of such ensembles.

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    Old The Beginnings of Buddhism in Japan
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: The two objects in this exhibition exemplify the birth of Buddhism in Japan. In 552, the Korean kingdom of Baekje sent the Japanese court sacred texts (sutras) and a gilt bronze sculpture, thought to be similar to the one on view.

    The Japanese, whose native gods did not have visible forms, were impressed by images of Buddhist deities and stories of their powers, as related in the sutras. Early adopters of Buddhism at court built temples and sponsored ceremonies, lectures, and the copying of sutras. In the mid-eighth century, Emperor Shōmu mandated a nationwide system of official temples. He also commissioned a more than fifty-foot-tall gilt bronze sculpture of the cosmic buddha for the Tōdaiji temple in Nara, the imperial capital. The sutra segment in this exhibition is traditionally called Ōjōmu (Great Shōmu) in the emperor’s honor.

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    Old Rediscovering Korea’s Past
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Today we admire the translucent gray-green celadon glaze on Korean ceramics of the Goryeo period as one of the great achievements of world potters. It is startling to realize that once this ware was all but forgotten. In Korea a millennium ago tastes changed. Other styles of ceramics replaced celadon in temples, palaces, and homes of the elite.

    In the late nineteenth century, long-respected tombs of royal figures and nobility from the Goryeo period (935–1392) became vulnerable to looting. Celadon and other cherished possessions of the deceased, preserved as burial offerings, were plundered and sold in the antiquities market. American doctor and diplomat Horace Newton Allen witnessed this rediscovery while he lived in Seoul from 1884 to 1905, and he formed his own sizeable collection of celadon, it seems, from objects on the open market.

    Charles Lang Freer purchased Allen’s collection in 1907. This large acquisition sparked Freer’s deep interest in this distinguished Korean ware. In turn, Allen, Freer, and other early collectors inspired generations of scholars to clarify the styles and dating of Goryeo celadon. Archaeologists have now identified and excavated the kiln complexes at Gangjin and Buan, which produced the finest celadon wares during the Goryeo dynasty.


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    Old Body Image
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: The human body, particularly the beautiful body, is central to artistic expression on the Indian subcontinent. Through the body, artists express fundamental beliefs about the nature of being, social ideals, gender roles, and hierarchies of power, both earthly and divine.

    The subcontinent, which extends from Pakistan eastward to Bangladesh and from Nepal southward to Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka, has long been culturally and religiously diverse. By grouping and juxtaposing masterpieces from the museum’s collection, this exhibition explores concepts and aesthetics of the body. The first room considers the perfect bodies of the Hindu gods before turning to the Indian courtly body as site of both pleasure and power. The rear gallery introduces the enlightened bodies of Buddhist and Jain traditions, as well as divine conceptions that transcend physical form.

    If the artworks themselves invite the sheer joy of looking, the theme of the body provides a portal for appreciating how India’s extraordinary culture is woven from distinctive but interrelated traditions. On a personal level, these works compel us to reconsider how our own ideals of beauty and gender, including the ways we hold, adorn, or modify our bodies, are shaped by our cultures.


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    Old The Glazed Elephant: Ceramic Traditions in Cambodia
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Water-pouring elephants; lime pots shaped like birds, rabbits, and lions; bottles with human faces and hands folded in reverence: these vessels feature in the ceramic traditions of the Angkor kingdom (802–1431). The Glazed Elephant explores these unconventional forms, their supposed functions, and the people who made and used them during this famous period in Cambodia’s history.


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    Old Gods, Companions, and Devotees
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Hinduism is a living religion with complex roots reaching back more than four thousand years. Its three major deities—the gods Shiva and Vishnu and the goddess with multiple names—each take on many forms. While the religion’s pluralism puzzles some, Hindus suggest that the infinite can be viewed as a diamond with innumerable facets. Acknowledging the power of an individual facet does not deny the validity of other deities, rituals, or beliefs.

    In many Hindu traditions, images of deities are a central focus of worship. Devotion can be expressed through commissioning, adorning, or singing to a god embodied in an image, or by donating the image itself to a temple. Images of divine companions, such as the eagle Garuda, represent ideal devotees and are themselves recipients of worship.

    All gods stand or sit on lotus blossoms, a symbol of purity. Because ornament is auspicious, deities are always well adorned with jewelry. Attributes, such as the god Ganesha’s sweets or Shiva’s third eye, reveal individual personalities and powers.


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    Old Power in Southeast Asia
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Through a range of local styles, techniques, and materials, the artworks in this exhibition reveal understandings of power in Southeast Asia. Large and small objects from Cambodia, Indonesia, and Thailand are clustered to explore the powers of warfare, water, snakes, and the feminine. These themes are both culturally specific and universally resonant.

    During the first millennium CE, maritime Southeast Asia became a network of trading polities boasting cosmopolitan emporiums. Inland dynasties established urban capitals. Flourishing during the ninth through the fourteenth century, these cities towered with temples and supported sophisticated courtly cultures. Their rulers fostered innovative artistic and architectural creations that blended imported ideas with local traditions.

    Cities arose at the archaeological areas of Angkor (Cambodia), Prambanan and Majapahit (Indonesia), Bagan (Myanmar), and Si Thep (Thailand). In each place, Buddhist and Hindu schools from India gained traction. Deities including Bhairava, Agastya, and the goddess were worshiped, and potent symbols, such as water and snakes, served as markers of the divine.


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    Old Ascend
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, California, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to May 31, 2018
    Detail: Current events, power, kingship and lyrical, storybook-like imagery intersect in Shiva Ahmadi’s video work Ascend. The artist depicts a curious and complex series of scenes that feature rustling leaves, faceless monkeys and a bubbling pool. Her animated watercolor painting morphs with a droning soundscape as the actions transition.


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    Old The Power of Words in an Age of Crisis: Buddhist Art in Japan
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Jun 01, 2018
    Detail: In an age when we can delete digital words with the press of a button, it can be hard to appreciate the sanctity, mystery, and power that written texts held for historic cultures. In Buddhism, the most powerful of all texts were the canonical scriptures known as sutras. These sutras were not only key vehicles for transmitting the teachings of the Buddha, known as the dharma, but they were also objects of numinous beauty, solace, and protection.

    Sutras took on particular importance in times of crisis. Buddhists in eleventh-century Japan believed they had entered the third and final age, during which a darkness of ten thousand years would obscure the dharma. Against this backdrop, sutras reached a peak of sumptuousness and artistry through aristocratic patronage. Protected in temples or ceremonially buried in tomblike mounds, these sutras would preserve the dharma until the Future Buddha descended to usher in a new golden age.

    The Future Buddha’s distant appearance ultimately gave way in Japan to the allure of immediate salvation through faith in Amitabha, the buddha of the Western Pure Land.


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    Old Ancient and Alive: Japan’s Native Gods
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 01, 2018 to Jun 30, 2018
    Detail: In Japan, native religious beliefs and practices, commonly called Shinto, flourished and evolved even after the introduction of Buddhism in the sixth century. The beliefs trace back to ancient times, and shrines dedicated to the gods called kami remain an important part of communal life.

    Ancient accounts say the kami created the Japanese islands, and they reside in natural features of the land. Important kami, although unseen, live in shrines. Believers pray to kami to protect households, celebrate births and marriages, and ask for prosperous harvests. Like Buddhist deities, kami help in times of illness or disaster, though Buddhist ceremonies are usually held for the deceased.

    Kami enjoy music, processions, and entertainments, and many festivals are still held annually today. The screens in this gallery depict such celebrations during the Edo period (1615–1868), when their festivals included horse races, boating parties, and picnics, enjoyed by a broad sector of Japanese society.


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    Old Center of the World: China and the Silk Road
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 02, 2018 to Jun 30, 2018
    Detail: Located in northwest China, Chang’an (modern Xi’an) served as the gateway to the so-called Silk Road, overland trade routes that linked the prosperous Tang empire with Central, West, and South Asia. Foreign merchants joined Buddhist missionaries, diplomatic envoys, translators, craftsmen, entertainers, and other skilled immigrants to transform Chang’an into a cosmopolitan city. This wealthy, worldly hub offered a ready market for exotic imports, including silver and gold objects, delicate glassware, and even grape wine. To meet accelerating demand for stylish goods, local artisans translated foreign designs into a Chinese style.

    Of all the travelers to Chang’an, the most successful group came from the distant kingdom of Sogdiana, located far to the west in modern Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. These Persian speakers seamlessly connected the cultural realms of China and Iran. While some traders and artisans traveled back and forth across Asia, others settled in China, where they helped fuel a fashion for Central Asian culture. One Sogdian community leader who died in China chose to be buried in a Sino-Sogdian manner and commissioned the funerary couch on view in this exhibition. Over time, the Sogdian population was gradually absorbed into Chinese society. Today, the Sogdians are regarded as a lost people.


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    Old Promise of Paradise: Ancient Chinese Buddhist Sculpture
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 02, 2018 to Jun 30, 2018
    Detail: Siddhartha Gautama, a prince born some twenty-five hundred years ago, is recognized as the Historical Buddha, or “Awakened One.” His enlightenment freed him from the cycle of rebirth, and his teachings became Buddhism’s foundation.

    The religion spread at a phenomenal pace. By 100 CE, missionaries had taken the Buddha’s teachings from his birthplace in South Asia to China. Within a few hundred years, Chinese Buddhist thinkers and translators were expanding the canon, also making it available to believers in Korea and Japan.

    Buddhism’s rapid evolution transformed China’s artistic landscape. To modern eyes, Chinese Buddhist sculpture from the sixth through the eighth century is among the most appealing in the history of art. As explored in this gallery, the period produced massive cave sites, grand temples, and monumental stone figures, as well as smaller images for domestic altars.

    The buddhas, bodhisattvas, and disciples in this exhibition were made to inspire and guide believers on their spiritual path. Their beauty imparted the promise of paradise.


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    Old Looking Out, Looking In: Art in Late Imperial China
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 02, 2018 to Jul 31, 2018
    Detail: Many of the powerful emperors of China’s last dynasties—the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1912)—were patrons, collectors, and casual practitioners of the arts. They used art to legitimize and glorify their rule. It served many functions: for state rituals, for expressing piety, to dazzle palace visitors, to build diplomatic relations, and for personal pleasure.

    The emperors’ officials oversaw the palace painting academy, imperial porcelain factory, and numerous other workshops. Their artists creatively reworked earlier traditions, which bolstered the emperors’ legitimacy by showing their command of China’s long history.

    Many emperors supported international trade with Japan and Korea, Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, and the Indian subcontinent as well as the Islamic world and Europe. These exchanges helped shape the development of Chinese art, especially in the early fifteenth-century and eighteenth-century courts emphasized in this gallery.

    While the Ming and Qing courts followed many of the same practices in government and art, the Ming emperors were native Chinese, and the Qing rulers were not. Heirs of Manchu chieftains who swept into China on horseback from the north, the Qing emperors embraced all things Chinese, but also steadfastly maintained their own traditions.


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    Old Art and Industry: China’s Ancient Houma Foundry
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 02, 2018 to Jul 31, 2018
    Detail: The largest bronze foundry complex from antiquity was excavated at Houma in northern China in the mid-twentieth century. At the two-acre site, archaeologists discovered evidence of extremely sophisticated manufacturing techniques. Fragments of reused clay models, master pattern blocks, and decorated clay molds indicate the adoption of ceramic pattern transfers to cast ornamented bronze objects. Using pattern blocks to increase the speed and volume of production without sacrificing quality was an astonishing innovation. Their presence proves foundries at Houma operated with a specialized workforce and a division of labor.

    The facility was established around 585 BCE by the rulers of the State of Jin, who remained its chief patrons for about 150 years. Houma produced ornamented objects with complex, abstract designs, inlay, and what is now considered to be the earliest pictorial narratives in China. More than half of the objects featured in this exhibition were made at Houma. Other pieces illustrate the factory’s long-lasting influence and legacy that extended into the Western Han period (206 BCE–9 CE).


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    Old Afterlife: Ancient Chinese Jades
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 02, 2018 to Jul 31, 2018
    Detail: A construction boom in China more than a century ago resulted in new railways and factories—and the accidental discovery of scores of rich ancient cemeteries. Buried in these tombs for thousands of years were jewelry and ritual objects, all laboriously crafted from jade. When Charles Lang Freer acquired many of them, their precise age was unknown. The modern science of archaeology was not practiced in China until 1928, when the Smithsonian sponsored its introduction. With the advent of archaeology came a better appreciation of the evolution of ancient Chinese mortuary culture and China’s art history.

    Today we know these jades represent the earliest epochs of Chinese civilization, the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age. Many came from the prehistoric burials of the Liangzhu culture (circa 3300–2250 BCE). These Stone Age people flourished in a large, fertile region between the modern cities of Shanghai, Hangzhou, and Nanjing. The graves they left behind now function like time capsules, providing insight into the dynamic character of ancient Chinese civilization during life and after death.


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    Old Setting the Bar: Arts of the Song dynasty
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Apr 02, 2018 to Jul 31, 2018
    Detail: China’s Song dynasty established many prototypes in government, society, and the arts. A system of schools and examinations for entering public office led to an efficient, centralized government headed by the emperor but staffed by well-educated commoners. Emerging as a class of scholar-officials, who were both artists themselves and consumers of art, these men looked to ancient tradition as a source for moral principle and creative inspiration.

    At the same time, a spirit of inquiry and close examination of nature led to advances in art and science. Widespread gains in literacy and disposable income also stimulated growth in the arts.

    Elegance and refinement in form, line, and color characterize the visual arts of China during the Song dynasty. As new technology enhanced ceramic production and the number of kilns rose, fresh approaches to decoration developed. The rise of ink painting paralleled a taste for monochrome ceramic glazes. A multitude of other painting styles and techniques emerged as well, with a strong preference for realistic detail, modulated colors, and individualized faces and postures.


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    Old When Pictures Speak: The Written Word in Japanese Art
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, California, USA
    Date: Apr 04, 2018 to Aug 19, 2018
    Detail: Words and pictures are often combined in Japanese art, to celebrate poems and stories, express religious teachings, and comment on current events. Though not unique to Japan, the marriage of text and image has flourished there, finding relevance within each new generation of artists, writers, and patrons.


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    Old Photography of British India 1840s-1910s
    Place: The San Diego Museum of Art - San Diego, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, California, USA
    Date: Apr 05, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Photography was introduced to India in the mid-nineteenth century, with the arrival of the British. Many early photographers were assigned by the British government to document Indian architecture, landscape, religions, and society. Their images, with a romantic and Eurocentric view, provided both their contemporaries and today’s spectators a sense of exoticism and distant memory, and at the same time a sense of visual wonder at the monuments and history of the Indian subcontinent.

    The prolific Samuel Bourne (1834–1912), one of the finest artistic photographers of the time, in 1863 joined a partnership in a highly successful commercial studio in India and produced exquisite scenic landscapes. Captain Edmund David Lyon (1825–1891), a former military officer, worked in India as a professional photographer from 1865 to 1869 and was commissioned by the government to photograph antiquities. William Johnson (active ca. 1840s–60s), a founding member of the Bombay Photographic Society in 1854, published the earliest ethnographic study in India that included photography. Johnson’s observational lens freezes his subjects in the capsule of time. Thomas Hesketh Biggs (1822–1905) was appointed as a government photographer in 1854 to document architecture and archaeological sites. Though short-lived, Biggs’s photographic career left important records of Indian monuments.

    This exhibition showcases the collection of Dr. Catherine Glynn Benkaim and Barbara Timmer and is organized into four categories: architecture/monuments, religions, culture, and landscape.


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    Old Mirroring China’s Past: Emperors and Their Bronzes
    Place: The Art Institute of Chicago - Chicago, 111 South Michigan Avenue, Illinois, USA
    Date: Apr 05, 2018 to May 13, 2018
    Detail: Mirroring China’s Past brings together approximately 180 works from the Art Institute of Chicago’s strong holdings and from the Palace Museum in Beijing, the Shanghai Museum, and important museums and private collections in the United States. By providing viewers with a new understanding of ancient bronzes and their significance through time, the exhibition illuminates China’s fascinating history and its evolving present.


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    Old Arts of South and Southeast Asia
    Place: The San Diego Museum of Art - San Diego, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, California, USA
    Date: Apr 05, 2018 to Jan 31, 2019
    Detail: Arts of South and Southeast Asia ranges in date from the first to the nineteenth century AD.

    The earliest works are mostly religious, relating to the ritual practices of Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism. Although each religion has a distinct set of gods and divinities, all three based the iconography of these figures on the human form. Buddhism spread along the Silk Road moving west to Pakistan and Central Asia, and east to China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Hinduism also traveled to Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia.

    During a series of invasions and migrations in the eleventh century, people from Central Asia moved into Pakistan and northern India. They brought India a new literary language, Persian, and Islam. By the end of the fifteenth century, European traders and missionaries began arriving by sea. They, in addition to goods, also brought oil paintings and engravings. These cultural influences thrived alongside traditions stemming from the region’s native languages, literatures, and religions, which continue to flourish.


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    Old Testimony
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, California, USA
    Date: Apr 06, 2018 to Jun 10, 2018
    Detail: San Francisco has long been a city of immigrants; by 1860, at least half of its residents were foreign-born. Today, 35% of San Franciscans were born in a country other than the United States. In this exhibition, artist Eliza Gregory introduces us to more than a dozen immigrants to San Francisco — from China, Germany, Guatemala, Iran, Korea, Mexico, Nepal, the Philippines, Russia and Vietnam — and asks, “What does it mean to belong?”


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    New XianRui: 10 Years
    Place: Chinese Culture Foundation of San Francisco - San Francisco, 750 Kearny St, 3rd Floor, California, USA
    Date: Apr 07, 2018 to Aug 08, 2018
    Detail: XianRui (Fresh and Sharp) Artist Excellence series is a signature CCC program that has highlighted exceptional but under-recognized artists of Chinese descent. The 10 Year anniversary celebrates this unique platform that has supported artists at critical junctures in their careers through a major solo show. The exhibition and related programming explores the impact of the program on featured artists and the evolution of Asian American artistic discourse. XianRui: 10 Years invites back the alumni artists to reflect on their careers and future trajectories.

    CCC elevates underserved communities and is a voice for equality through education and contemporary art. Founded in 1965, our work is based in Chinatown and San Francisco’s open and public spaces, and other art institutions.


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    Old Sacred Realms: Temple Murals by Shashi Dhoj Tulachan From the Gayle and Edward P. Roski Collection
    Place: Bowers Museum - Santa Ana, 2002 North Main Street, California, USA
    Date: Apr 12, 2018 to May 31, 2018
    Detail: The nine oversized paintings shown in this exhibition are all the work of one extraordinary 69-year-old Buddhist monk named Shashi Dhoj Tulachan, a second generation thangka artist living in Tuksche, a remote village located in Mustang, Nepal\'s northernmost district adjacent to Tibet.

    Shashi Dhoj Tulachan has devoted much of his life to the restoration of a nearby 16th century gompa (Tibetan monastery) known as the Chhairo Gompa.

    He is part of a local initiative, the Kali Gandaki Foundation Trust, which is dedicated to raising money to preserve the Chhairo Gompa.

    The practice of thangka painting is centuries old and is an art carried out by highly trained monks for the purpose of teaching about Buddha and the tenets of the Buddhist religion. The overwhelming amount of detailed imagery in each painting includes deities, mythologies, and the use of repeated and abstracted design. For those seeking enlightenment, thangka paintings exist as objects of meditation.

    The paintings in this collection are not thangkas in the traditional sense. Thangkas are usually much smaller and are rolled on canvas so that they can be easily transported and hung anywhere for teaching. The thangkas exhibited here are similar in size to mural paintings found in monasteries. These paintings also deviate from the rules for the creation of a thangka where the exact use of color, shape, proportion, characteristics and qualities of the imagery are all strictly regulated.

    Shashi Dhoj Tulachan has painted this set of images by combining the traditional motifs of one of the foremost schools recognized by high-level monks in Tibet today, the Tibetan Karma Ghadri School, with images that are purely and cleverly of his imagination. The vibrant colors he used are made from natural mineral pigments


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    Old Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China
    Place: Cincinnati Art Museum - Cincinnati, 953 Eden Park Drive, Ohio, USA
    Date: Apr 20, 2018 to Aug 12, 2018
    Detail: The exhibition will feature approximately 120 individual objects, which include terracotta figures of warriors, arms and armor, ritual bronze vessels, works in gold and silver, jade ornaments, precious jewelry, and ceramics, all drawn from the collections of art museums and archaeological institutes in Shaanxi province, China. Dating from the Pre-Qin period (770–221 BC) to the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC), these works of art, excavated from the emperor’s mausoleum, as well as aristocratic and nomadic tombs, will represent history, myths, and burials in ancient China.

    The exhibition will explore the following themes: the birth of the Qin empire and cultural diversity in ancient China; the First Emperor and unified China; and the quest for immortality. Through presenting rich archaeological finds, the exhibition will provide a glimpse into the ongoing excavations and research, which continue to shed new light on the Qin culture and the First Emperor’s burial complex.


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    Old A Guided Tour of Hell
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, California, USA
    Date: Apr 20, 2018 to Sep 16, 2018
    Detail: A guided tour of one man’s harrowing descent into the Tibetan Buddhist realms of hell encourages us to contemplate the meaning of life and the consequences of negative action.


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    Old On the Shelves of Kam Wah Chung & Co.: General Store and Apothecary in John Day, Oregon
    Place: The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) - New York, 215 Centre Street, USA
    Date: Apr 26, 2018 to Sep 09, 2018
    Detail: On the Shelves of Kam Wah Chung is an immersive exhibition that celebrates the medical practice of Ing “Doc” Hay who became a prominent figure in eastern Oregon after the California Gold Rush.

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    Old Chinese Medicine in America: Converging Ideas, People, and Practices
    Place: Museum of Chinese in America - New York, 215 Centre Street, USA
    Date: Apr 26, 2018 to Sep 09, 2018
    Detail: Chinese Medicine in America: Converging Ideas, People and Practices is a sweeping cultural exploration of Chinese medicine that combines ancient metaphysical concepts including yin yang, qi, and five phases with the modern practices of Chinese medicine in America, such as herbal treatments and acupuncture. The exhibition tells a cross-cultural story of Chinese medicine and practices in America through historical medical artifacts, contemporary art, and profiles on notable figures in Chinese medicine history to create an engaging space for exploring how medicine, philosophy and history are linked.

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    Old The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative: Final Exhibition
    Place: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum - New York, 1071 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: May 04, 2018 to Jul 04, 2018
    Detail: The third and final exhibition of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative will present new commissions by artists born in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macao. Launched in 2013, the initiative engages artists, scholars, and curators from around the world to bring intersecting regional and global conversations and contemporary practices to the fore. Through the selection of key artists, practices, and issues arising from across Greater China, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative strengthens the Guggenheim’s collegial network among the Chinese art community and expands the discourse and investigation of contemporary art today.


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    Old One Hand Clapping
    Place: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum - New York, 1071 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: May 04, 2018 to Oct 21, 2018

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    Old Voyage to Vietnam: Celebrating the Tet Festival
    Place: Bowers Museum - Santa Ana, 2002 North Main Street, California, USA
    Date: May 26, 2018 to Aug 19, 2018
    Detail: Santa Ana, CA Bowers Kidseum will open Voyage to Vietnam: Celebrating the Tet Festival in May 2018; a new exhibition to promote understanding of Vietnamese culture.

    Children and their parents throughout the country will delight in the opportunity to discover the beauty, sights and sounds of Vietnam through its most important celebration of the year, Tet.


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    Old Clouds Stretching for a Thousand Miles: Ink in Asian Art
    Place: Asia Society - New York, 725 Park Avenue, USA
    Date: Jun 22, 2018 to Aug 12, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition celebrates the versatility and enduring influence of the calligraphic ink tradition across Asia. The works on view, selected from Asia Society Museum’s new acquisitions of contemporary ink and calligraphic art, highlight exemplary works by Gu Wenda, Minjung Kim, Qiu Zhijie, Sun Xun, and Wang Dongling. These contemporary works, displayed alongside two illuminated Qur’ans from China and Central Asia, reveal the innovative use of ink and calligraphy in visual expression, from the thirteenth century to the present, across Asia and the diaspora.


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    Old Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors
    Place: The Cleveland Museum of Art - Cleveland, 11150 East Boulevard, Ohio, USA
    Date: Jul 07, 2018 to Sep 30, 2018
    Detail: Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors is a celebration of the legendary Japanese artist\'s 65-year career, covering every aspect of the artist\'s oeuvre from her early paintings to her widely admired participatory installations. Visitors have the unprecedented opportunity to discover six of Kusama\'s captivating Infinity Mirror Rooms alongside a selection of her other key works, including a number of paintings from her most recent series, My Eternal Soul, making its US debut. From her radical performances in the 1960s, when she staged underground polka-dot \"Happenings\" on the streets of New York, to her latest Infinity Mirror Room, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016), the exhibition showcases Kusama\'s full range of talent. Don\'t miss this unforgettable sensory journey through the mind and legacy of one of the world\'s most popular artists.


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    New Love Affairs: The Tale of Genji in Japanese Art
    Place: Minneapolis Institute of Art - Minneapolis, 2400 Third Avenue South, USA
    Date: Aug 18, 2018 to Mar 10, 2019
    Detail: The Tale of Genji is celebrated as Japan’s greatest literary work. Written in the early 1000s by Murasaki Shikibu, a lady-in-waiting at the imperial court, the tale traces the life and romantic pursuits of an imperial prince called “Shining Genji.” Rich in poetry and offering an intimate look at the court, it has inspired countless Japanese artists over the centuries, and illustrations of or allusions to the tale appear on everything from paintings, prints, and decorative artworks to clothing and manga (comic books). This exhibition will focus on Genji-related art created over the past 500 years. Shown in two rotations—each encompassing almost 5,000 square feet—the exhibition will feature woodblock prints alongside folding screens, lacquerware, kimono, and art in other media from Mia’s renowned collection of Japanese art.


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    Old The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India
    Place: Asia Society - New York, 725 Park Avenue, USA
    Date: Sep 15, 2018 to Jan 20, 2019
    Detail: Just over seven decades after the declaration of India’s independence in 1947 and the emergence of a modern art movement in India, Asia Society presents a landmark exhibition of works by members of the Progressive Artists’ Group, which formed in Bombay, now Mumbai, in the aftermath of independence. The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India will examine the founding ideology of the Progressives and explore the ways in which artists from different social, cultural, and religious backgrounds found common cause at a time of massive political and social upheaval.

    Though the group disbanded in 1956, the movement continued to animate and give visual expression to India’s modern identity, with many of the group’s artists creating their most iconic works after this period. Works in the exhibition—primarily oil paintings­ from the 1940s to 1960s—underscore how these artists gave visual form to the idea of India as secular, heterogeneous, international, and united. Like their counterparts in the West, India’s modern masters mined multiple sources of inspiration while forging their own distinctive styles. Their consideration of the ways in which a new secular republic could emerge from a rich, multi-religious tradition continues to be relevant today.

    The exhibition comprises important works from the Group’s core founders—K.H. Ara, S.K. Bakre, H.A. Gade, M.F. Husain, S.H. Raza, and F.N. Souza—as well as later members and those closely affiliated with the movement: V.S. Gaitonde, Krishen Khanna, Ram Kumar, Tyeb Mehta, Akbar Padamsee, and Mohan Samant.

    The exhibition is organized by Zehra Jumabhoy, guest curator, and Boon Hui Tan, Director of Asia Society Museum. An illustrated catalogue featuring essays by leading scholars of Indian art and modern history will accompany the exhibition.


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    Old Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India
    Place: Seattle Art Museum - Seattle, 1300 First Avenue, USA
    Date: Oct 18, 2018 to Jan 21, 2019
    Detail: Centuries of royal treasures from Jodhpur, India, come to the United States for the first time in the new exhibition Peacock in the Desert.

    Imagine yourself in the luxuriant royal spaces of India’s historic courtly life. Resplendent with brilliant paintings, lavishly made ceremonial objects, finely crafted arms and armor, sumptuous jewels, and intricately carved furnishings, Peacock in the Desert will transport you to the royal palace of Jodhpur, India.

    Nearly four centuries of artistic creation from one of the largest former princely states in India, the kingdom of Marwar-Jodhpur in the northwestern state of Rajasthan, will fill SAM’s galleries. Some 250 paintings, decorative arts, tents, canopies, carpets and other textiles, jewelry, and weapons will be presented beside large-scale photomurals which evoke the stunning setting of the Mehrangarh Museum in Jodhpur.

    Many of these masterpieces and relics have not been seen beyond palace walls and most have never traveled to the United States. These treasures trace the evolving historical framework of royal identity in India from the 17th century to the establishment of independence after 1947 and reflect the artistic legacy of the Rathore dynasty, who ruled the Marwar-Jodhpur kingdom for more than seven centuries.

    Drawn primarily from the collections of the Mehrangarh Fort Museum of Jodhpur and private collections of the Jodhpur royal family, this evocative exhibition illuminates hundreds of years of Indian courtly life.


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    Old The Terra Cotta Warriors
    Place: Bowers Museum - Santa Ana, 2002 North Main Street, California, USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2019 to Dec 31, 2019
    Detail: The Bowers Museum is thrilled to announce that it will be presenting an exhibition highlighting China’s terra cotta soldiers for a third time in the museum’s history.


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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    Old Vis à Vis: Asia Meets Europe
    Place: Staatliche Museen zu Berlin - Berlin, Matthäikirchplatz, Germany
    Date: May 12, 2017 to Apr 30, 2019

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    Old South Asian Design
    Place: Manchester Art Gallery - Manchester, Mosley Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 19, 2017 to May 27, 2018
    Detail: Exploring how South Asian traditional crafts are inspiring exciting contemporary art, design and fashion.


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    Old A New Perception – View on China
    Place: Weltmuseum Wien - Vienna, Heldenplatz, Austria
    Date: Oct 25, 2017 to Jun 30, 2018
    Detail: Archaeological findings, such as silk and jade, throughout the area of the Roman Empire prove that these valuable goods already found their way from the Han Empire to Europe two thousand years ago. In the Age of Enlightenment (ca. 1650–1800), the upper class was eager for Chinese luxury goods, e.g. porcelain, tea, lacquer work, or silk. Moreover, sophisticated accomplishments, such as the concept of order in Confucianism or an education-oriented civil service culture, shaped Europe’s view on China.

    Geopolitical interests resulted in a sudden change in Europe’s perception of China in about 1800. In the course of industrialisation, the West needed new sales markets and intended to expand its political-economic sphere of influence. The period of the 19th century was characterised by wars between China and Europe, ranging from the so-called Opium Wars (1839–1842 and 1856–1860) to the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, in the suppression of which the Imperial and Royal Army of Austria-Hungary was also involved. Once positively connoted Chinese values changed to the opposite and were perceived as despotic, cruel, and backwardly.

    Daily except Wednesday
    10 am to 6 pm

    Friday
    until 9 pm

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    Old 1873 – Japan comes to Europe
    Place: Weltmuseum Wien - Vienna, Heldenplatz, Austria
    Date: Oct 25, 2017 to Jun 30, 2018
    Detail: The World\'s Fair in Vienna in 1873 marked an important moment in the history of Japan. After being forced by external pressure to open up, and after an interior restructuring of the country, Japan found itself in turmoil. Following the abolition of the old feudal system in the course of the Meiji Restoration, Japan endeavoured to present itself in Europe as a modern state.

    A commission, to which also foreigners such as the brothers Alexander and Heinrich von Siebold belonged, was formed in Japan. According to the officially published catalogue, this group compiled over 6,000 objects to be presented in Vienna.

    A key theme of the exhibition in Vienna was architecture, and one of the largest items exhibited in the Japanese pavilion at that time was the model of a daimyō residence of the Edo period (1600 – 1868); this is the central piece of this gallery. Objects from the collection of the World Museum Vienna serve to illustrate the residence of a feudal lord and member of the Japanese military elite.

    The second half of the room is devoted to the cultural exchange between Japan and Europe in the Meiji period (1868 – 1912). The artistic movement of Japonism was a Western response to the new language of forms, and Japanese ornament found its way into, amongst other things, Art Nouveau style.

    Daily except Wednesday
    10 am to 6 pm

    Friday
    until 9 pm

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    Old Dressed to impress: Netsuke and Japanese Men’s Fashion
    Place: The Museum of East Asian Art - Bath , 12 Bennett Street, United Kingdom
    Date: Nov 04, 2017 to Apr 22, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition explores the intricate accessories worn by Japanese men during the Edo period (1615-1868). Netsuke are a form of Japanese miniature sculpture that were primarily functional, but evolved into an important art form. The exhibition features five netsuke and other objects chosen from the British Museum’s collection, with more pieces added from MEAA’s collection to show the range and beauty of these objects and their excellent craftsmanship.

    The exhibition places the netsuke and other objects in context with a sword and bespoke male kimono to demonstrate how they were worn as a complete outfit in the 18th century.


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    Old Masked Warriors. Battle Stage of the Samurai
    Place: Japanmuseum SieboldHuis - Leiden, Rapenburg 19, Netherlands
    Date: Dec 08, 2017 to May 27, 2018
    Detail: Battle Stage of the Samurai’ will be on view at Japan Museum SieboldHuis. The focal points in this splendid exhibition will be played by Nō-masks and the masks of the famous Japanese samurai warriors. Spectacular artefacts from international and private collections, including swords, screens, kimonos, helmets and bows, will illustrate the beauty and power of Nō-theatre and the samurai culture.


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    Old Splendours of the Subcontinent: A Prince’s Tour of India 1875-6
    Place: The Queen\'s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse - Edinburgh, Canongate, Royal Mile, United Kingdom
    Date: Dec 15, 2017 to Apr 22, 2018
    Detail: In October 1875, the Prince of Wales set off on a four-month tour of the Indian Subcontinent, visiting over 21 localities, which today encompass India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Nepal. Developed in collaboration with Cartwright Hall, Bradford, and New Walk Museum & Art Gallery, Leicester, Splendours of the Subcontinent: A Prince\'s Tour of India tells the story of this grand tour through some of the finest Indian treasures from the Royal Collection that were presented to the Prince during his visit.


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    Old Ghosts and Hells - the underworld in Asian art
    Place: Musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac - Paris, 37 Quai Branly, France
    Date: Apr 10, 2018 to Jul 15, 2018
    Detail: The exhibition focuses its attention on Asian ghost stories, delving into the world of spirits, terror and fantastic creatures as it takes visitors on a journey to the edges of reality, through religious art, theatre, cinema, contemporary design and manga.

    From Buddhist to J-Horror, from Hokusai prints to Pac-Man, from the Thai spirit culture to horror manga, the figure of the ghost has haunted the Asian imagination for centuries. In China, Thailand and Japan - the lands that the exhibition focuses on - the popular infatuation with terror is very real, and one that permeates a wide variety of cultural productions. From spirits that wander the forest, vengeful cat-women and hungry spirits that return from the dead ("the walking dead") to jumping vampires and yokaïs (supernatural creatures in Japanese folklore), these can appear in multiple guises and play on artistic periods and media.

    Ghosts and Hells - the underworld in Asian art explores their omnipresence not only in objects and documents but also in the performing arts, cinema and comics in an attempt to better understand how they work. After all, whilst Buddhism has played its part in the formation of this imagination – implying that souls are in waiting between two reincarnations –, it is indeed on the fringes of religion, in popular and secular art, that the representation of ghosts has truly come into its own.


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    Old A Taste for the Exotic European: Silks of the Eighteenth Century
    Place: Abegg-Stiftung - Riggisberg, Werner Abeggstrasse 67 , Switzerland
    Date: Apr 29, 2018 to Nov 11, 2018
    Detail: Early eighteenth-century silks are remarkable for their profu-sion of exotic patterns. The textile designers who created them were inspired by illustrated accounts of travels in Asian lands as well as wares imported from the Near and Far East. These influences gave rise to fabrics with bizarre compositions and chinoiseries. Frequently changing pattern styles defined what counted as fashionable. This special exhibition presents a selection of these magnificent silks along with elegant ladies’ and gentlemen’s costumes from the same period.


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    Old Four centuries of South Asian Paintings and Manuscripts
    Place: The Queen\'s Gallery, Buckingham Palace - London, Buckingham Palace Rd, Westminster, United Kingdom
    Date: Jun 08, 2018 to Oct 14, 2018
    Detail: The Royal Collection\'s group of South Asian paintings and manuscripts contains some of the most important and well-preserved examples in the world. For the first time, highlights from this superb collection will be brought together in an exhibition at The Queen\'s Gallery exploring the long-standing relationship between the British Crown and South Asia. From illuminated Mughal manuscripts and exquisite natural history paintings to modern masterpieces and vivid depictions of the Hindu pantheon of gods, the works of art on display will span a geographical expanse from Kashmir to Kerala and a period of more than 400 years.


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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    Old Nestorian Crosses of the Yuan Dynasty
    Place: University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong - Hong Kong, 90 Bonham Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
    Date: Jun 10, 2016 to Dec 31, 2022
    Detail: The University of Hong Kong’s (HKU) Nestorian crosses were assembled by a Mr. F. A. Nixon who served as a British postal commissioner in Beijing in the 1930s and 1940s. Subsequently the collection was acquired by the Lee Hysan Foundation and donated to Hong Kong University in 1961.

    Nestorian bronze crosses were cast in the Ordos region in north-west China (Inner Mongolia) during the Yuan dynasty (1272–1368). They measure between 3 and 8 cm in height, are flat plaque-like ornaments with an outline in high relief and have a loop on the back suggesting that they were used as personal seals and were worn on the body. The loop facilitates a strapping to human clothing or girdles. The fine motifs of the cast Christian and Buddhist symbols and the rare survival of red-coloured ink deposits in intermittent lower parts of the design, suggested that these seals were used as chops and transferred their individual designs by printing them on other matters. Although all crosses are cast, the Nestorian crosses all seem to be unique and are, in fact, characteristic for their individual designs.

    Stylistically, all crosses fall into 4 different categories, many with mixed Christian and Buddhist motifs in the same artefact. The majority are executed in crucifix form—hence the group description as ‘crosses’—with either flat or round ends. Other ‘crosses’ in fact take the shape of animals, predominantly birds, but also hares and fish, as well as geometrical patterns, such as sun-like designs and miscellaneous Chinese seal-like forms.


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    Old Bruce Lee:Kung Fu ‧ Art ‧ Life
    Place: Hong Kong Heritage Museum - Hong Kong, 1 Man Lam Road, Sha Tin, Hong Kong
    Date: Jul 20, 2016 to Jul 20, 2018
    Detail: Presented by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department
    Jointly organised by Bruce Lee Foundation and Hong Kong Heritage Museum
    Sponsored by Fortune Star Media Limited


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    Old Seeds of Culture: From Living Plants to Handicrafts
    Place: Traditional Arts and Ethnology Centre - Luang Prabang, Laos
    Date: Sep 17, 2016 to Sep 15, 2018
    Detail: The exhibition is curated by Dr. Yukino Ochiai, an ethnobotanist and professor at Ryukoku University in Kyoto, Japan, and it explores the importance of nature for culture.

    Focusing on the grass plant Job’s tears (Coix), or mak dueay, “Seeds of Culture” draws on Dr. Ochiai’s over 15 years of field research in Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar to show that the wild and domesticated plants of Job’s tears are used as food, medicine, and beads by ethnic groups belonging to different linguistic categories. In particular, the seed beads have been used for costume decoration in beautiful and striking combinations. Over the years, Dr. Ochiai has amassed an unparalleled collection of objects featuring the plant’s seeds.


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    Old The Palace Museum Ge Ware Exhibition
    Place: The Palace Museum - Beijing, 4 Jingshan Qianjie, People's Republic Of China
    Date: Nov 12, 2017 to Aug 31, 2018
    Detail: In the history of ceramics in China, the Ru Kiln, Guan Kiln, Ge Kiln, Ding Kiln, and Jun Kiln are collectively known as the \'Five Great Kilns\'. The Palace Museum, a national-level museum, houses one of the largest collections of the finest artifacts from these Five Great Kilns, most of which were part of the Qing dynasty court collection.

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    Old Ancient Religions
    Place: Asian Civilisations Museum - Singapore, 1 Empress Place, Singapore
    Date: Dec 12, 2017 to Dec 31, 2021
    Detail: The ACM permanent galleries on Level 2 explore how artists have masterfully expressed complex ideas about life and existence with religions in sculpture and paintings. Beginning with the Ancient Religions exhibition, which explores early styles and motifs of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism in India and how they spread to China and the larger Southeast Asia, the story continues in the following galleries as the art developed and evolved through the centuries.

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    Old LOVE Long: Robert Indiana and Asia
    Place: Asia Society Hong Kong Center - Admiralty, 9 Justice Drive, Hong Kong
    Date: Feb 07, 2018 to Jul 15, 2018
    Detail: This exhibition presents some of the most memorable works by the legendary American Pop artist Robert Indiana (b.1928) along with works by eight Asian artists and collectives from Asia: Kutluğ Ataman, Candy Factory, Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries, Chim↑Pom, He An, Hung Keung, Charwei Tsai, and Xu Bing. Threading through these multilingual, multicultural works is a sustained investigation of language. These artists share poetic sensibilities with Indiana, creating work that examines the nuances between words and images. LOVE Long affirms that art is a universal language built upon the fundamental human desire to express and communicate.


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    Old From Two Arises Three: The Collaborative Works of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney
    Place: University Museum and Art Gallery, HKU - Hong Kong, 90 Bonham Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 02, 2018 to May 06, 2018
    Detail: An exhibition highlighting the extraordinary collaboration of artists Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney. The unbroken Chinese ink painting tradition has developed continuously over the course of more than a millennium, and this evolution continues into the present day, as evidenced by the current popularity of contemporary ink. While Chinese contemporary art has gained prominence over the past decades, there has been a clear dichotomy between purely contemporary works and those with a stronger connection to tradition. This division now appears to be fading as traditional aesthetics merges with newer forms of media.

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    Old A beast, a god, and a line
    Place: Para Site - Quarry Bay, 22/F, Wing Wah Industrial Building, 677 King’s Road, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 17, 2018 to May 20, 2018

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    Old The Blue Road: Mastercrafts from Persia
    Place: Liang Yi Museum - Sheung Wan, 181-199 Hollywood Road, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 20, 2018 to Jun 24, 2018
    Detail: Curated by Dr. Yuka Kadoi, The Blue Road: Mastercrafts from Persia is not only the first, but also the most dedicated and comprehensive exhibition surveying different aspects of the colour blue in Persian art and history, ever to be held in Hong Kong.


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    Old Legacy of the Heavenly Breeze: The Art of Gao Qifeng, Chao Shao-an and Au Ho-nien
    Place: Art Museum, CUHK - Shatin, N.T, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 24, 2018 to May 13, 2018

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    Old The sun teaches us that history is not everything
    Place: Osage Hong Kong - Kowloon, 4/F, 20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 25, 2018 to May 05, 2018
    Detail: Exhibition Opening Sunday 25 March 2018
    Artists and curator Talk Sunday 25 March 2018 4-6pm
    Vernissage Sunday 25 March 2018 6-8pm (including performances by Shima & Tang Kwok Hin)
    Exhibition continues Sunday 26 March – 6 May 2018

    This exhibition is a part of the Osage Art Foundation\'s \"Regional Perspectives\" platform that puts the production of art in Asia into a critical perspective in relation to other geographies. The first iteration of this initiative was the exhibition \"South by Southeast\" curated by Patrick Flores and Anca Verona Mihulet and presented by the Osage Art Foundation in 2015, and the extension of the project \"South by Southeast: A Further Surface\" presented by Guangdong Times Museum in 2016.


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    Old STONE II | Shi Zhiying Solo Exhibition
    Place: Leo Gallery - Hong Kong, SOHO 189 Art Lane, 189 Queen's Road West, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 26, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Leo Gallery Hong Kong is very pleased to present “STONE II”—a continuation of Chinese artist Shi Zhiying\'s previous theme on "STONE". Having her exquisite observation and perception of the gravel, the exhibition will bring viewers into a dilemma of losing focus with no centre point to glance over but still catching up on the smallest details through the changes in Shi’s strokes and colours.

    For the purpose of presenting a scene that embraces micro and macro coexistence, the artist conveys an ongoing relationship between the “appearing” and “disappearing” of the stones in the nature and the paint on the canvas. Shi believes ever since the moment her brush touched the canvas, a motion underneath that could extend infinitely started. It intersects with the layer of stones and that of the paint continuously, until the very last minute in the process of painting.

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    Old Seaming and Regenerating: From Zurich to Art Basel Hong Kong
    Place: Leo Gallery - Hong Kong, SOHO 189 Art Lane, 189 Queen's Road West, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 26, 2018 to Apr 30, 2018
    Detail: Leo Gallery Hong Kong is delighted to present Tan Ping’s solo exhibition Seaming and Regenerating: From Zurich to Art Basel Hong Kong, curated by Huang Du.

    Tan Ping is widely recognised as one of the most influential contemporary artists of his generation and a central figure among Chinese abstract painters. In 2016, Tan was invited to start his Overspreading series at the Helmhaus Zürich museum in Switzerland. He believes that when he creates one of his paintings, it generates a unique, site-specific bond between the work and its environment. He conveys such a powerful connection through a striking visual language: that is, extending his brushstroke beyond the physical boundaries of the canvas, and breaking through onto the wall. He also questions whether or not separating his works from their original context causes uncertainties about their presence. One year later, in 2017, Tan took his investigation into the relationship between his works and their exhibition space a step further by detaching his previous works from the museum and bringing them to Leo Gallery Hong Kong for the first time.

    Transferring the works from a museum to a gallery raises the question of whether their displacement invisibly breaks their connection with their spatial context. From the artist’s point of view, an important part of the painting has been removed by the change of location, and only the remainder arrives at a new space.

    This year, Tan’s works will again be detached from their original context of the Swiss museum, to Leo Gallery’s new exhibition space at the Art Basel Hong Kong, removing them from the place that anchored their original inspiration. Tan Ping uses the term “seaming” to describe the efforts he makes when he creates new meaning out of his previous works in a new location. A new form of visual expression is constructed on the intertwining relationships among location, inspiration and state of creation.

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    Old Dechun Wu Art Exhibition
    Place: Main Trend Gallery - Taipei City, No.209-1, Sec. 3, Chengde Rd., Datong Dist., Taiwan
    Date: Apr 14, 2018 to May 12, 2018

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    Old The Glass that Gallé Adored — Glass from the Qing Imperial Collection
    Place: Suntory Museum of Art - Tokyo, Tokyo Midtown Galleria 3F, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Japan
    Date: Apr 25, 2018 to Jul 01, 2018
    Detail: The Qing Dynasty was an extraordinary period in the long history of Chinese glass. The great strides made during this period were due to the decision of the fourth Qing emperor, Kangxi, to establish a glassworks inside the Forbidden City in 1696. His successor, Yongzheng, continued the project, which reached its peak during the reign of the sixth emperor, Qianlong. Qing glass treated transparency and opaqueness as equals and was imbued with great dignity. In this exhibition, we introduce Qing works with extraordinarily beautiful designs with works by Emile Gallé influenced by them.


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    Old The Ryukyu Kingdom of Beauty
    Place: Suntory Museum of Art - Tokyo, Tokyo Midtown Galleria 3F, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Japan
    Date: Jul 18, 2018 to Sep 02, 2018
    Detail: The many islands of Okinawa, formerly called Ryukyu, were where the drama of one of East Asia’s most glorious maritime kingdoms was staged. The Ryukyu Kingdom, building on its cultural riches, developed its own distinctive arts, including gorgeous textiles, dazzling lacquer, and paintings, stimulated by its neighboring countries, including China and Japan. This exhibition is an opportunity to explore the brilliance of Ryukyu Kingdom art, in which East Asian cultures were blended to create new beauty, in a special collection of rare works, including treasures from the Ryukyu Kingdom’s Sho Dynasty.


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    Old Treasures from Daigoji Temple
    Place: Suntory Museum of Art - Tokyo, Tokyo Midtown Galleria 3F, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Japan
    Date: Sep 19, 2018 to Nov 11, 2018
    Detail: As a center for Shingon Esoteric Buddhism, Kyoto’s Daigoji temple has long been a setting for historic events. In this exhibition, we explore Daigoji’s transformations from the Heian period down to modern times, using rarely shown historical materials and documents, with a primary focus on Buddhist statues and paintings designated as National Treasures or Important Cultural Properties. This will also be an extraordinary opportunity to see historical materials related to the famed cherry blossom viewing at Daigoji held by Toyotomi Hideyoshi in 1598, together with fusuma paintings and gorgeous depictions of Daigoji in modern art.


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    Old In the Country of Fans, Japan
    Place: Suntory Museum of Art - Tokyo, Tokyo Midtown Galleria 3F, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Japan
    Date: Nov 28, 2018 to Jan 20, 2019
    Detail: Did you know that slim, accordion-fold fans are a Japanese invention? These fans, which have broad and deep roots in Japanese life, appearing in religious festivals, daily life, performances, and games, have evolved a rich decorativeness. Highly portable, ready to be enjoyed anywhere, they are perhaps our most familiar and accessible example of “Art in Life.” Moreover, folding fans have helped generate a diverse range of related works of art, including folding screens, handscrolls, craft arts, and textiles. In this exhibition, we introduce the enduring world of the fans so long beloved by Japanese.


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    Top | Exhibition Public | Fairs | Exhibition Private | Conference/Symposium | Auctions
    Fairs
    USA & Canada Europe & Africa | Asia

    Old TEFAF New York Spring 2018
    Place: Park Avenue Armory - New York, 643 Park Avenue, USA
    Date: May 04, 2018 to May 08, 2018
    Detail: TEFAF champions the finest art through the ages and from around the world. It brings together a network of top international dealers, who, through a combination of expertise and accessibility, inspire lovers of art from around the world.


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    Old TEFAF New York Fall 2018
    Place: Park Avenue Armory - New York, 643 Park Avenue, USA
    Date: Oct 27, 2018 to Oct 31, 2018
    Detail: The New York Fall Fair is a joint venture between TEFAF and the art investment advisory firm, Artvest Partners. It is TEFAF's debut outside Europe and allows a vital, transatlantic meeting ground for a global community of dealers, collectors, curators, interior designers and art-and-antiques enthusiasts.


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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    Old Asian Art in Brussels
    Place: Sablon - Brussels, Belgium
    Date: Jun 06, 2018 to Jun 10, 2018
    Detail: ASIAN ART IN BRUSSELS brings together leading antique dealers. Conferences by specialists in Asian Art are organized in cooperation with museums.


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    Old The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia
    Place: Olympia London - London, Hammersmith Road, United Kingdom
    Date: Jun 25, 2018 to Jul 01, 2018
    Detail: The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia, held in the heart of London, showcases 160 of the world\'s leading specialist art and antiques dealers. Taking place for seven days only, London\'s longest running Fair brings together an unrivalled choice of over 50,000 pieces.

    Loved by collectors, interior designers and those looking for exceptional pieces for stylish interiors, The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia showcases the finest array of art and antiques including a wide range of antique furniture, alongside jewellery and collectables. From antiquity to the present day every item for sale is checked by a team of experts to ensure quality and authenticity before the Fair opens to the public - enabling you to buy with confidence.

    Monday 25 June - Preview Day

    Opening Times
    Monday 25 June PREVIEW 4pm - 9pm
    Tuesday 26 June 11am - 8pm
    Wednesday 27 June 11am - 8pm
    Thursday 28 June LATE NIGHT 11am - 9pm
    Friday 29 June 11am - 7pm
    Saturday 30 June 11am - 7pm
    Sunday 1 July 11am - 5pm


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    Old Parcours des mondes 2018
    Place: Saint-Germain-des-Prés - Paris, France
    Date: Sep 11, 2018 to Sep 16, 2018
    Detail: More than 60 of the world\'s best international dealers specializing in tribal and Asian art, come together in Paris for the 16th annual presentation of the leading even in its field.


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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    Old Art Busan 2018
    Place: BEXCO Exhibition Center 1 - Busan, 55 APEC-ro, U-dong, Haeundae, Korea
    Date: Apr 20, 2018 to Apr 22, 2018
    Detail: Art Busan, which was launched in 2012 with the purpose of transforming Busan into the city of art and culture, has held a variety of exhibitions introducing the current and future trends of contemporary art, and it has now become the largest nationwide art festival.

    Art Busan has served as an art platform which actively responded to changes in the art market and introduced original programs based on its own vision. It has also strived to promote the excellence of Korean artists and discover new artists and introduce them to the global art market through a number of special and collaborating exhibitions.

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    Old Affordable Art Fair
    Place: Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre (HKCEC) - Wan Chai, Hall 3D&E, 1 Expo Drive, Hong Kong
    Date: May 18, 2018 to May 20, 2018
    Detail: The sixth edition will showcase around 110 established and exciting new galleries with fresh and affordable art priced between HK$1,000 and $100,000.

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    Old Art Revolution Taipei
    Place: Taipei World Trade Center Hall 3 - Taipei, 11F, No.167, Sec.5, Mingsheng E. Rd., Taiwan
    Date: May 18, 2018 to May 21, 2018
    Detail: Art Revolution Taipei features leading and emerging galleries and artists around the globe. Hundreds of artists, ranging from the established to the latest generation of emerging figures will be represented in the show's multiple sections.


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    Old Asia Week Hong Kong
    Place: Conrad Hong Kong - Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Date: May 23, 2018 to Jun 02, 2018
    Detail: Taking place annually in May and June, Asia Week Hong Kong offers a series of art events and programming with a focus on on Asian art. Our partners in showcasing Asian antiquities and contemporary art include dealers, galleries, auction houses, museums, cultural institutions and collectors' societies.

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    Old International Antiques Fair 2018
    Place: Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre - Hong Kong, 1 Expo Dr, Wan Chai, Hong Kong
    Date: May 25, 2018 to May 29, 2018

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    Old Art Jakarta
    Place: The Ritz-Carlton Jakarta - Jakarta, Pacific Place, Indonesia
    Date: Aug 02, 2018 to Aug 05, 2018
    Detail: Since its first edition in 2009, Art Jakarta has developed and established itself as the most prominent contemporary art fair in Indonesia and the region. As the first and foremost art fair in Indonesia, Art Jakarta embraces all stakeholders, from artists, galleries, collectors, to art enthusiasts, and serves as a platform in the development of Indonesia's art market and discovery of new talent. 2018 will be an important year for Art Jakarta as it will mark its 10th anniversary.


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    Old Kalaa Spandan Art Fair
    Place: Nehru Centre - Mumbai, India
    Date: Nov 23, 2018 to Nov 26, 2018
    Detail: Indian Art Promoter has started Kalaa Spandan Art Fair in order to render the art arena an opportunity to showcase their artistic talents through a very economical platform in metro cities of India & abroad & thus enabling the art fraternity to find out the elegant creations as well as the unveiled, untold & unimagined contemporary artworks from various corners of the globe at an affordable cost.

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    Top | Exhibition Public | Fairs | Exhibition Private | Conference/Symposium | Auctions
    Exhibition Private
    USA & Canada Europe & Africa | Asia

    Old Munakata and the Disciples of Buddha
    Place: Ronin Gallery - New York, 425 Madison Ave. 3rd Fl, USA
    Date: Mar 02, 2017 to Apr 29, 2019
    Detail: On View: March 2 – April 29, 2017
    Opening Party: Tuesday, March 7, 2017 5:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.
    Asia Week Reception and Matcha Tasting: Saturday, March 11, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    Ronin Gallery is honored to present Munakata and the Disciples of Buddha during Asia Week 2017. This exhibition invites you to experience the woodblock prints of Shiko Munakata (1903 - 1975) and to discover the Buddhist roots of Japanese woodblock printing. Culminating in his iconic series Ten Great Disciples of the Buddha, the exhibition explores the vital interplay of artistic tradition and religious practice behind Munakata’s groundbreaking work. Starting with the origins of Japanese woodblock printing in the 12th century, to the ukiyo-e prints of the Edo and Meiji periods, the exhibition Munakata and the Disciples of Buddha places this innovative master of modern woodblock printmaking within centuries of tradition. Also on exhibit will be an exceptionally rare calligraphy kakejiku (scroll painting) by Munakata from the private collection of Munakata\'s granddaughter, Yoriko Ishii, as well as other important hand-colored works.

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    Old Circle with Radius of Zero: Recent works by Annysa Ng
    Place: China 2000 Fine Art - New York, 177 East 87th Street, Suite 601, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2018 to Apr 26, 2018
    Detail: CHINA 2000 FINE ART takes great pleasure in presenting six recent paintings by Annysa Ng, a New York-based, Hong Kong-born artist with extraordinary breadth and depth of vision. In the exhibition, Circle with Radius of Zero, Annysa Ng addresses the coexistence of separate identities, the inherent ineffability of the void, the cycle of birth and rebirth, the conscious and unconscious mind, and the transient, intangible, and invisible force of death that enlightens the meaning of life. Annysa Ng\'s art vibrates to the rhythm of such profound philosophical reflection that it challenges the intellect and engages the viewer. And yet it is the visual beauty, grace and delicacy of her artwork that make these potent musings, restrained by a fierce splendor, even more powerful.

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    Old Parallel Lives
    Place: Kaikodo - New York, 74 East 79th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2018 to May 18, 2018
    Detail: The exhibition “Parallel Lives,” KAIKODO JOURNAL XXXIV, is organized to highlight the parallels that exist between works of art and, more generally, the temporal, technical and aesthetic correspondences and analogies between works of art. We have included Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese works or art and have presented them as The Ancients (1-4); The Three Religions (5-7); The Purity of Stonewares (8-11); Dark Stonewares (12-14); Blue on White (15-20); Florid (21-25); and Rock (26). In the world of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean painting, parallels lives can be traced in shared subject matter and style, which can be recognized and understood even though the paintings here are presented chronologically rather than thematically.

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    Old Rasheed Araeen I Recent Works
    Place: Aicon Gallery - New York, 35 Great Jones Street , USA
    Date: Apr 05, 2018 to May 12, 2018

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    Old Changsha and Song Ceramics from F. Manfredini Collection
    Place: Renzo Freschi - Milano, Via Gesù, 17, Italy
    Date: May 16, 2018 to Jun 16, 2018

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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    Old Earthen Beauty: Masterpieces of Early Thai Ceramics from the Dr. Kurt Sandmair Collection
    Place: Michael Woerner at The Architects\' House - Brussels, 21 Rue Ernest Allard, Belgium
    Date: Jun 06, 2018 to Jun 10, 2018
    Detail: This year\'s special exhibition “EARTHEN BEAUTY. Masterpieces of Early Thai Ceramics from the Dr. Kurt Sandmair Collection” will showcase the astonishing variety and quality of Thai ceramics from the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages.

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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    Old Awaiting: New Works by Wang Tiande
    Place: Alisan Fine Arts Ltd - Central, 21/F Lyndhurst Tower, 1 Lyndhurst Terrace, Hong Kong
    Date: Mar 26, 2018 to May 05, 2018
    Detail: Alisan Fine Arts is proud to present a solo exhibition of internationally acclaimed Chinese artist Wang Tiande. This will be the fourth solo exhibition the gallery has organized for him since 2003. Known for his landscape and calligraphic incense paintings, Wang has been using incense sticks in lieu of brushes to \"paint\" for over 15 years. His paintings are made up of two layers of rice paper. He uses incense sticks to create burn marks on the first layer of rice paper and paints on the second layer of rice paper with Chinese ink, thus transforming paintings of traditional landscapes and calligraphy into contemporary artworks. With each new series, he has invigorated and added new dimensions to classical landscape painting.


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    Top | Exhibition Public | Fairs | Exhibition Private | Conference/Symposium | Auctions
    Conference/Symposium
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    Old Ancient China in a Eurasian Context
    Place: UC Santa Barbara Confucius Institute, University of California - Santa Barbara, 2220 Humanities & Social Sciences Building,, California, USA
    Date: Apr 20, 2018 to Apr 21, 2018
    Detail: Event Date:
    Friday, April 20, 2018 - 8:30pm to Saturday, April 21, 2018 - 1:30pm


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    Old His Holiness The Sakya Trichen: A talk and book launch for Freeing the Heart and Mind
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th Street, USA
    Date: Apr 23, 2018
    Detail: His Holiness Kyabgon Gongma Sakya Trichen Rinpoche, the forty-first head of the Sakya School of Tibetan Buddhism, gives a special talk on the eighth-century Buddhist master Padmasambhava, who is said to have prophesied the achievements of thirteenth-century Drogön Chögyal Phagpa. The Second Buddha anticipated that the fifth leader of the Sakya School would bring Vajrayana Buddhism to China. Indeed, he became the first imperial preceptor under Kublai Khan and thus converted the Mongols to Tibetan Buddhism. Evoking the lama mani tradition, the Sakya Trichen will use tangkas on stage of the Second Buddha and Chögyal Phagpa to introduce the texts in his new book, Freeing the Heart and Mind, Part Two: Chogyal Phagpa on the Buddhist Path, and demonstrate with his customary clarity the relevance of these historic texts today.

    The full ticket option includes a copy of Freeing the Heart and Mind, Part Two, attendance of blessing of the Rubin’s Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room in the Sakya tradition by His Holiness (at 6:15 PM), and preferred seating in the theater.

    Copies of part 1 and part 2 of Freeing the Heart and Mind will be available for purchase in the shop.

    This talk will be also be viewable as a Facebook Livestream.


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    Old Soft Power: The Inspiration Behind David Henry Hwang's New Play
    Place: USC Center on Public Diplomacy - Los Angeles, 3502 Watt Way, California, USA
    Date: Apr 24, 2018
    Detail: Tony Award® winner David Henry Hwang (\"Yellow Face,\" \"M. Butterfly\") joins CPD and Center Theatre Group to discuss the inspiration behind his upcoming world premiere of \"Soft Power,\" which begins at the Ahmanson Theatre May 3, 2018. Discover how Hwang collaborated with Tony Award-winning composer Jeanine Tesori (\"Fun Home\") to translate China’s interests in achieving soft power into a new piece of theatre for Los Angeles audiences. Sasha Anawalt, Professor and Director of USC Annenberg\'s Arts Journalism program will moderate this conversation.


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    New Contested Embrace: Transborder Membership Politics in Twentieth-Century Korea
    Place: UCLA Center for Chinese Studies - Los Angeles, 11381 Bunche Hall, California, USA
    Date: Apr 26, 2018
    Detail: Jaeeun Kim will talk about her award-winning book Contested Embrace: Transborder Membership Politics in Twentieth-Century Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016).

    Scholars have long examined the relationship between nation-states and their "internal others," such as immigrants and ethnoracial minorities. Kim shifts the analytic focus to explore how a state relates to people it views as "external members" such as emigrants and diasporas.

    Contested Embrace is a comparative, historical, and ethnographic study of the complex relationships among the states in the Korean peninsula, colonial-era Korean migrants to Japan and northeast China and their descendants, and the states in which they have resided over the course of the twentieth century. Extending the constructivist approach to nationalisms and the culturalist view of the modern state to a transnational context, Contested Embrace illuminates the political and bureaucratic construction of ethno-national populations beyond the territorial boundary of the state. Through a comparative analysis of transborder membership politics in the colonial, Cold War, and post-Cold War periods, the book shows how the configuration of geopolitics, bureaucratic techniques, and actors' agency shapes the making, unmaking, and remaking of transborder ties. Kim demonstrates that being a "homeland" state or a member of the "transborder nation" is a precarious, arduous, and revocable political achievement. The talk will flesh out these claims through the analysis of (1) South Korea’s effort to create its own docile citizens out of ethnic Koreans in Japan in the fierce competition with North Korea; and (2) South Korea’s effort to control its territorial and membership boundary from ethnic Korean “return” migrants from China


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    Old Independent Film-Making In Contemporary China
    Place: The Pacific Club - Newport Beach, 4110 MacArthur Blvd, California, USA
    Date: Apr 26, 2018
    Detail: The Orange County World Affairs Council presents a dinner and talk by Professor Paul Pickowicz on how independent film-making has developed in China.


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    Old Industrial Eden: A Chinese Capitalist Vision
    Place: University of Southern California - Los Angeles, 3501 Trousdale Parkway, California, USA
    Date: Apr 26, 2018
    Detail: Join the USC U.S.-China Institute and USC professor Brett Sheehan for a discussion on the evolution of Chinese capitalism chronicling the fortunes of the Song family of North China under five successive authoritarian governments.


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    New China and the Global South: The Question of Hegemony
    Place: UCLA Center for Chinese Studies - Los Angeles, 11381 Bunche Hall, California, USA
    Date: May 03, 2018
    Detail: Talk by Ho-fung Hung, Johns Hopkins University

    Many see the Chinese economic miracle as an illustration of an alternative model of development to the neoliberal orthodoxy. It is also assumed that China’s increasing economic and political involvement in the Global South, from its Asia neighbors to countries in faraway developing regions, challenge American domination. In this paper, I argue that China’s export-oriented developmental miracle is in fact a constitutive part of the global neoliberal order, and is made possible by unique conditions difficult to be replicated in other places. At the same time, China’s overseas economic interests is still relatively small if we discount capital flight in the outgoing flow of investment. Having that said, China’s rise as a capital exporter is still making it follow the footstep of preceding capitalist-hegemonic powers to protect its global economic interests by learning to project its political influence overseas. Having been a free rider in the US-centered global order for decades, mastering the skill of exercising its political and military muscle on the global stage effectively is going to be a long process for China.


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    New Moving Borders — Tibet in Interaction With its Neighbors
    Place: Asia Society - New York, 725 Park Avenue at 70th Street, USA
    Date: May 04, 2018
    Detail: Peripheral Visions: An Indian Buddha in the Tibetan Imaginary

    India holds a central place in the story of Buddhism’s arrival to Tibet, even as it lies on the geographic periphery of the Himalayan plateau. Peripheral Visions explores images, texts, and narratives of Buddha Sakyamuni’s life from the Tibetan monastery of Jonang Puntsokling, the seat of the acclaimed Buddhist master Taranatha (1575-1634). This extraordinary program of literary and visual works, executed by Taranatha in the early seventeenth century and examined by Giuseppe Tucci some three centuries later, projected the presence and prestige of a distinctly Indian Buddha onto the Tibetan landscape.

    Andrew Quintman of Yale University gives the Keynote Address to introduce a day-long symposium which will focus on the topic of the moving borders of the Tibetan cultural zone across the centuries from the imperial period to the present, including the Western exploration of Tibet.


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    New A Possible Buddhist Influence On Chinese Political Thought
    Place: Stanford University, Stanford Humanities Center - Stanford, 424 Santa Teresa St, California, USA
    Date: May 04, 2018 to May 05, 2018
    Detail: Much work has been done in recent decades on the way in which Chinese rulers made use of Buddhism to bolster their power, but in fact some Buddhist ideas concerning kingship found in South Asian materials were quite negative. China was in imperial times an autocracy in which such negativity towards kingship generally did not flourish. But if we look carefully, is there really no trace at all of these Buddhist ideas entering the Chinese tradition of political thought? This lecture will suggest that at one point one subversive suggestion may have slipped in, and may indeed have exerted a hidden but not inconsequential influence.


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    Old Sijo Workshop: Comparing Korean Poetry with Chinese and Japanese Verse
    Place: Indiana University East Asian Studies Center - Bloomington, 355 North Jordan Avenue, Indiana, USA
    Date: May 12, 2018
    Detail: Educators will be introduced to Chinese, Japanese, and Korean poetic forms (jueju, haiku, and sijo, respectively) through a series of lectures and hands-on sessions. Participation includes a travel/accommodation stipend, all texts and materials, three meals, and 8 hours of continuing education credit.

    Presenters include:

    Daniel Hsieh (East Asian Languages, Purdue University)

    David McCann (Emeritus, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University)

    Elizabeth Jorgensen (Arrowhead Union High School, Wisconsin)


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    New HomeEventsPodcastsVisiting ScholarsAboutSupport (No)worries about China: Contemporary Intellectual Trends and Their Social Environment
    Place: UCLA Center for Chinese Studies - Los Angeles, Brunche Hall 6275, 315 Portola Plaza, California, USA
    Date: May 17, 2018
    Detail: Talk by Chaohua Wang, UCLA

    The UCLA Center for Chinese Studies hosts Chaohua Wang for a talk surrounding how intellectual discussions have progressed in China.


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    Old The Economic History Of China: From Antiquity To The Nineteenth Century
    Place: UCLA Center for Chinese Studies - Los Angeles, Brunche Hall 6275, 315 Portola Plaza, California, USA
    Date: May 25, 2018
    Detail: The UCLA Center for Chinese Studies presents a book symposium on China\'s economic history.

    China\'s extraordinary rise as an economic powerhouse in the past two decades poses a challenge to many long-held assumptions about the relationship between political institutions and economic development. Economic prosperity also was vitally important to the longevity of the Chinese Empire throughout the preindustrial era. Before the eighteenth century, China\'s economy shared some of the features, such as highly productive agriculture and sophisticated markets, found in the most advanced regions of Europe. But in many respects, from the central importance of irrigated rice farming to family structure, property rights, the status of merchants, the monetary system, and the imperial state\'s fiscal and economic policies, China\'s preindustrial economy diverged from the Western path of development. In this comprehensive but accessible study, Richard von Glahn examines the institutional foundations, continuities and discontinuities in China\'s economic development over three millennia, from the Bronze Age to the early twentieth century.


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    Old 2018 NCTA Teaching East Asian Literature Workshop
    Place: Indiana University East Asian Studies Center - Bloomington, 355 North Jordan Avenue, Indiana, USA
    Date: Jul 08, 2018 to Jul 13, 2018
    Detail: Each day professors and experts will lead lectures and discussions on the literature and history of China, Japan, and Korea. Every afternoon a high school world literature teacher experienced in teaching East Asian literature will lead strategy sessions on how to teach the works at the high school level.

    Workshop sessions will be supplemented with daily cultural activities and film screenings. Participation includes: • Set of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literary works covered in workshop (mailed to participants prior to workshop) • Free lodging at the Indiana Memorial Union Biddle Hotel • At least one meal a day • Certificate of completion • Option to purchase three graduate credits from Indiana University • $300 school resource-buying grant for purchasing East Asian literature for classroom use, provided upon completion of all requirements


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    New Resistance Reimagined: East Asian Languages And Cultures Graduate Student Symposium
    Place: University of Southern California - Los Angeles, 3501 Trousdale Parkway, USA
    Date: Sep 29, 2018
    Detail: The University of Southern California hosts a graduate symposium on the new forms of resistance in society and political change.


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    New Post-Humanism In Modern Chinese Culture
    Place: University of New Hampshire - Durham, 15 Library Way, New Hampshire, USA
    Date: Sep 29, 2018 to Sep 30, 2018
    Detail: The Confucius Institute at the University of New Hampshire presents a conference focused on the study of post-humanism in modern Chinese culture.


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    Top | Exhibition Public | Fairs | Exhibition Private | Conference/Symposium | Auctions
    Auctions
    USA & Canada Europe & Africa | Asia

    Old Asian Art
    Place: Heritage Auctions - Beverly Hills, 9478 West Olympic, First Floor, California, USA
    Date: Jun 29, 2018

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    Old Asian Works of Art
    Place: Leslie Hindman Auctioneers - Chicago, 1338 West Lake Street, USA
    Date: Sep 24, 2018 to Sep 25, 2018

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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    Old Asian Art
    Place: Bonhams Knightsbridge - Knightsbridge, London, Montpelier Street, United Kingdom
    Date: Apr 14, 2018 to May 15, 2018

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    Old Rugs and Carpets: Including Distinguished Collections
    Place: Sotheby’s - London, 34-35 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: Apr 23, 2018
    Detail: Sotheby’s London is delighted to announce its new Spring Rugs and Carpets sales to be held alongside London Islamic week. Our sale includes distinguished collections and offers a wide range of property drawn across Europe and the USA, with selected works representative of the international weaving centres of Persia, Caucasus, Anatolia, Central Asia, China, and Europe. We also include the second instalment of the prominent collection of Christopher Alexander; the first half formed the core of the NOVEMBER SALE last year. This second group being offered focuses almost exclusively on early and archaic Anatolian examples, with the exception of a beautiful vibrant green Khorossan fragment.


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    Old Islamic and Indian Art
    Place: Bonhams London - London, 101 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: Apr 24, 2018

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    Old An Absolute Unique Kendi Hongzhi Mark and Period
    Place: Genève Enchères - Geneva, rue de monthoux 38, Switzerland
    Date: Apr 26, 2018

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    Old Spring Auction
    Place: Hermann Historica - München, Linprunstraße 16 , Germany
    Date: May 01, 2018 to May 11, 2018

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    Old The Julius and Arlette Katchen Collection of Fine Netsuke: Part III
    Place: Bonhams London - London, 101 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 16, 2018

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    Old Important Chinese Art
    Place: Sotheby’s - London, 34-35 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 16, 2018
    Detail: Sotheby’s Important Chinese Art sale in May includes a strong selection of imperial porcelain, headlined by a magnificent blue and white moonflask of the Qianlong period. Exquisite vessels from the Song dynasty are also featured, such as a highly-attractive splashed Jun bubble bowl, alongside a carefully curated selection of works of art, gilt-bronze figures and paintings.


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    Old Fine Chinese Art
    Place: Bonhams London - London, 101 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 17, 2018

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    Old Fine Japanese Art
    Place: Bonhams London - London, 101 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 17, 2018

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    Old St George Street Sale: Chinese Art
    Place: Sotheby’s - London, 34-35 New Bond Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 18, 2018
    Detail: Our second St George Street Sale of Chinese Art is mainly comprised of six diverse private collections of jade, ceramics, snuff bottles and works of art that reflect the individuality of the collection and the collector. Spanning almost the length and breadth of the history of craftsmanship in China, this sale continues to cater to a broader market.


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    Old Asian Art
    Place: Bonhams - Edinburgh, 22 Queen St, United Kingdom
    Date: Jul 11, 2018

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    Old Asian Art
    Place: Bonhams - Edinburgh, 22 Queen St, United Kingdom
    Date: Dec 05, 2018

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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    Old Asian Art
    Place: Bonhams - Woollahra, Sydney, 97-99 Queen Street, Australia
    Date: May 09, 2018

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    Old Scholarly Art from the Collection of Mr and Mrs Gerard Hawthorn
    Place: Sotheby’s - Queensway, 5/F One Pacific Place, Hong Kong
    Date: May 31, 2018

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    Old Chinese Art
    Place: Sotheby’s - Queensway, 5/F One Pacific Place, Hong Kong
    Date: May 31, 2018 to Jun 01, 2018

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