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Thursday, April 09, 2020
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    New Arts of Asia
    Place: The Walters Art Museum - Baltimore, 600 N. Charles Street, Maryland, USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2017 to Sep 30, 2020
    Detail: Find time for tranquility and reflection in Arts of Asia, the Walters’ new installation of one of the most exceptional collections of Asian art in North America. The dramatic display offers a rich exploration of artistic traditions from diverse cultures and regions across India, Nepal, Tibet, China, Korea, Japan, Myanmar, Thailand, and Cambodia. The stunning array of 150 works spanning 2,000 years includes more than 30 objects that have never been on view. Visitors are invited to enjoy the stillness and serenity of these works of art and to share the experience of quiet contemplation that they inspire.


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    New Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia
    Place: Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution - Washington, D.C., 1050 Independence Ave SW, USA
    Date: Oct 14, 2017 to Oct 14, 2020
    Detail: Encounter Buddhist art through the lens of spiritual practice and the perspectives of practitioners. Drawing on the Freer|Sackler’s collections from across Asia, this exhibition expands the understanding of Buddhism in Asian art through both beautiful objects and immersive spaces. Visitors can step into a Tibetan Buddhist shrine, travel the Buddhist world with an eighth-century Korean monk, visit a Sri Lankan stupa, meet teachers and guardians, and discover multiple Buddhas and bodhisattvas. Encountering the Buddha illuminates the ways in which art and place embody and express the teachings of Buddhism.

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    New The Art of Lacquer
    Place: Crow Museum of Asian Art - Dallas, 2010 Flora St, USA
    Date: Sep 28, 2018 to May 03, 2020
    Detail: The Art of Lacquer introduces lacquerware objects from the museum’s collection.


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    New Charged with Buddha’s Blessings: Relics from an Ancient Stupa
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: May 31, 2019 to Jun 08, 2020
    Detail: See it to believe whether Buddhist relics and their stories have power. In the late 19th century, excavation of a site in northern India revealed an ancient stupa with five intact reliquaries, one of which had an inscription claiming it contained the remains of the Buddha. This installation tells the story of this remarkably discovery and features the offerings of gems and gold foil ornaments that were enshrined together with the reliquaries. In essence, these items can be considered “contact relics,” imbued with the blessings of the Buddha’s corporeal remains, objects with the power to increase merit.

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    New Future Retrospective: Master Shen-Long
    Place: Crow Museum of Asian Art - Dallas, 2010 Flora St, Texas, USA
    Date: Jun 01, 2019 to Aug 23, 2020
    Detail: For over 50 years, Master Shen-Long, a contemporary master of the classical Chinese literati perfections of painting, poetry, and calligraphy, as well as seal-carving, has pioneered new approaches to painting that has made him one of the most innovative ink artists of this generation.

    In the early 1990s, he developed a new abstract ink method for paper and canvas, resulting in richly detailed reversible works that blur the line between painting and sculpture, and expresses unlimited time, space, and energy. He works in a limitless variety of styles, formats and techniques. Influenced by his deep understanding of Buddhist, Daoist and Confucian philosophies, Master Shen-Long’s bold and experimental work challenges traditional assumptions about Chinese painting, and raises important concepts regarding mankind’s relationship with the universe.

    This exhibition will not only serve as the artist’s mid-career retrospective, but is also the artist’s first solo museum presentation in Texas.


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    New In the Company of Friends: The Kettering and Patterson Legacy
    Place: Dayton Art Institute - Dayton, 456 Belmonte Park North, Ohio, USA
    Date: Jun 12, 2019 to May 17, 2020
    Detail: In China, there was a long tradition of collectors known as scholar-officials. The arts played a central role in the life of scholars as ways to cultivate oneself and helped to create communities of like-minded friends. As social leaders they set examples of what others could aspire to: living a life of thoughtful understanding, beauty, and friendship.

    In a similar way, Virginia W. Kettering and the Honorable Jefferson Patterson were leaders of the Dayton community who were also collectors of Asian art, and through their generosity these collections formed the basis of the DAI’s extensive collection. As part of the DAI’s 2019 Centennial, this Focus Exhibition explores the contributions of Kettering and Patterson through the lens of the Chinese scholar collector, presenting a variety of artworks that may have been part of a scholar’s life, and raising the broader question of just what it means to collect.


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    New Divine Women, Divine Wisdom
    Place: The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive - Berkeley, 2155 Center Street, California, USA
    Date: Jun 26, 2019 to May 24, 2020
    Detail: For millennia and throughout the world, secular and religious art has celebrated the power and beauty of women in representations of the female form. In art from South Asia and the Himalayan region, women are often depicted and appreciated within the context of Hindu and Buddhist traditions for their beauty, fecundity, wisdom, power, and compassion. This exhibition seeks to explore the feminine image and the female role in the great traditions within a particular region of Asia. The elegant representations of women as classical beauties can be seen in an early second- or third-century Gandharan sculpture of the goddess Tyche, who is closely associated with good luck. Later, within the Buddhist tradition, she becomes the deity Hariti, who with her consort Pancika are regarded as the model couple. The sweet face of a girl in Bust of a Young Woman, which was made at about the same time and within the same Gandharan tradition, underscores the mastery of the sculptor who brought to life the simple innocence of a girl lost in her own thoughts. Images of robust women both large and small represent South Asian ideals of beauty that emphasize the fecundity of their bodies. Within the Himalayan tradition the sensual is replaced with measured restraint and a contemplative appearance. The divine Tara is understood through her gracious gaze to embody a deep spiritual understanding and compassion. On the other hand, Prajnaparamita, shown with multiple arms and armor-like jewelry, exudes great power as the personification of wisdom.


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    New Weng Family Collection of Chinese Painting: Family and Friends
    Place: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, USA
    Date: Oct 12, 2019 to Aug 09, 2020
    Detail: Celebrating a landmark gift of Chinese art

    There is an intimate connection between Chinese art and human relationships. Friends gather to unroll and view their favorite paintings. Moving letters brushed in expressive calligraphy are cherished and preserved for centuries. Wan-go H. C. Weng, one of the most respected collectors and connoisseurs of Chinese painting in the US, recalls watching and listening as a young boy while his family admired and discussed works of art.

    In 2018, Weng made the largest gift of Chinese paintings and calligraphy to the MFA in the institution’s history, comprising 183 objects that were acquired and passed down through six generations of his family. This exhibition features approximately 20 works from the gift that relate to concepts of family and friends.

    “Weng Family Collection of Chinese Painting: Family and Friends” includes paintings and calligraphy by some of the greatest masters from the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties. The intimate Suzhou Sceneries (1484–1504) album describes Shen Zhou’s travels with friends around his home regions. The calligraphy in Nine Letters to Home (1523), written by Wen Zengming to his wife and sons, displays a spontaneity of style rarely found in the artist’s more formal works. The most recent piece in the exhibition is a handscroll painted by Wan-go H. C. Weng himself, Elegant Gathering at the Laixiju Studio (1990). The contemporary work commemorates a momentous gathering of friends—including six esteemed historians of Chinese paintings—held at the collector’s home in 1985.

    This is the first in a series of three exhibitions celebrating the landmark donation made by Wan-go H. C. Weng, a longtime supporter of the MFA who has devoted himself to the preservation and study of China’s cultural heritage.


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    New Chang Dai-chien: Painting from Heart to Hand
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, USA
    Date: Nov 26, 2019 to Apr 26, 2020
    Detail: Celebrating Chang Dai-chien
    Chang Dai-chien is one of the most acclaimed Chinese artists of the 20th century. To mark the 120th anniversary of his birth and 47 years since his previous solo show at the museum, we are inaugurating the newly renovated Chinese painting gallery with Chang Dai-chien: Painting from Heart to Hand. Comprising works donated to the museum by the artist, as well as loans from his friends and family, the exhibition spotlights Chang’s groundbreaking modernization of ink painting.

    Born in 1899 in Sichuan province, Chang traveled extensively to seek sources of inspiration in the historical past and in nature. In the early 1940s, he spent more than two years studying and copying ancient Buddhist paintings in the caves of Dunhuang, instigating new interest in these overlooked masterpieces. His exhibitions following this sojourn earned him artistic success and recognition as a true master.

    Chang left China in 1949, eventually settling in California in 1969, first in Carmel-by-the-Sea and then Pebble Beach. During this period of self-imposed exile, he was inspired by Western art and California’s distinctive landscape, and his splashed-color paintings came close to total abstraction.

    Chang left California in 1977 for Taiwan, where he died in 1983. He continues to be internationally recognized as a pivotal figure who expanded the field of traditional Chinese ink painting. We are pleased to honor his legacy with this exhibition showcasing his unique artistic vision.

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    New Exceptionally Ordinary: Mingei 1920–2020
    Place: Seattle Art Museum - Seattle, 1300 First Ave, USA
    Date: Dec 14, 2019 to Jul 11, 2020
    Detail: Initiated in 1920s by the Japanese collector and connoisseur Yanagi Soetsu (1889–1961), the Mingei movement elevated functional, everyday crafts to art objects. While folk arts were important sources in the foundation of the movement, Mingei’s impact goes beyond Japanese folk crafts and even beyond the artists closely associated with the movement in the mid-twentieth century. Ranging from mid-century decorative arts to contemporary designs, the ceramics, textiles, sculptures, and prints in this exhibition are seen as exceptional art works in the broad applications of Mingei. Created by artists from Japan, Korea and the US, they all share characteristics of Mingei, such as the anonymity and honest labor of the maker as well as the simplicity and functionality of the objects. Positioning Mingei within a history of crafts and crafts-making, this exhibition celebrates the legacy of Mingei as its centennial approaches.


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    New Conservation in Action: Japanese Buddhist Sculpture in a New Light
    Place: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, USA
    Date: Dec 15, 2019 to Jun 30, 2020
    Detail: A rare, behind-the-scenes look at the conservation of seven Buddhist sculptures

    Visitors are invited to watch as objects conservators study and treat seven Japanese Buddhist sculptures in a public conservation studio. The wooden figures—images of worship depicting Buddhas, Guardian Kings, and a Wisdom King—are decorated with polychromy or gilding and date from the 9th to the 12th centuries. The conservation project occupies an entire gallery in the Museum, allowing visitors to observe the techniques employed by objects conservators as they carefully clean the sculptures and secure areas of loose paint, lacquer, and gilding. The gradual relocation of the sculptures from the Museum's beloved Japanese Buddhist Temple Room, where they normally reside, enables museum-goers to see the objects in a new setting for the first time in decades. Also on exhibit are three sculptures from storage that serve as points of comparison to exemplify different sculptural techniques, styles, and states of preservation.

    The public studio also provides a space for conservators and curators to look closely at the sculptures in collaboration with the Museum's research scientists, identifying the original artists' materials, documenting early restorations, and working with wood anatomists in Japan to confirm the wood identifications. In 2020, the sculptures will return to the refurbished Japanese Buddhist Temple Room.


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    New Brave Warriors and Fantastic Tales: The World According to Yoshitoshi
    Place: The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive - Berkeley, 2155 Center Street, California, USA
    Date: Jan 15, 2020 to May 31, 2020
    Detail: Among the last great ukiyo-e artists of Meiji Japan, Taiso Yoshitoshi (1839–1892) reigned supreme for his daring prints based on various tales and legends of ancient Japan and China. He made use of Western colors and inks for dramatic effect, yet stayed loyal to the woodblock print techniques that had guided past masters. In his short life, he created numerous series exploring a multiplicity of themes related to Japan’s rich history. In Brave Warriors, legendary warriors of Japan come to life to bring honor to themselves and their masters. In One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, exquisitely attired men and women are cast as theatrical players in settings that evoke melancholy, romance, and bravery. Fantastic creatures inhabit his series known as Thirty-Six Ghosts, featuring figures that both frighten and amuse the viewer with their dramatic design.

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    New Awaken: A Tibetan Buddhist Journey Toward Enlightenment
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin St, USA
    Date: Jan 17, 2020 to May 03, 2020
    Detail: Embark on a Journey That Will Change You Forever

    Wake up! Open your eyes, clear your head and leave the chaotic, fractured world behind. Embark on a journey that will change you forever. We’ll provide a guide, a map and everything else you’ll need to reach your destination.

    To gently guide you on your path, Awaken: A Tibetan Buddhist Journey Toward Enlightenment brings together Buddhist artworks from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Asian Art Museum, home to two of the country’s most significant collections of Himalayan art. Sculptures, paintings, textiles and book arts made between 800 and 2016 chart a transformative journey from the ordinary world to awakening.

    By inviting you to participate in a narrative experience of these artworks from the viewpoint of a practitioner, Awaken suggests that it is the emphasis on meditative visualization that accounts for the particularity of Himalayan Buddhist imagery. Vajrayana Buddhism, which took hold in Tibet in the 8th century, emphasizes the act of seeing: the practice depends on artworks created as visual aids to meditation, objects that transform awareness and ultimately bring about enlightenment, or awakening.

    Awaken begins with works that speak to the unbalanced nature of our contemporary existence. After meeting some of Himalayan Buddhism’s most interesting masters, you then meet your guide, or guru, in the form of an early 17th-century painting of Gorampa Sonam Sengge, the sixth abbot of Ngor monastery, who will lead you on a path out of this chaos. He reveals the map of your journey, a colorful, densely illustrated 17th-century mandala from Gorampa’s own monastery. A mandala is at once a floorplan of a divine palace, a chart of the entire cosmos, and an inner image of the mind. Each section of the mandala, each stage on its imaginative visual path from fierce guardians at the corners to the deity in the center, is brought to life by artworks in the galleries.

    At the end of your journey — the center of the mandala — you will see the cosmos as a whole. Art has catalyzed your transformation, your newfound knowledge that the world is not fragmented, but instead fundamentally interconnected. You are awake.

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    New Where the Truth Lies: The Art of Qiu Ying
    Place: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Resnick Pavilion - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., California, USA
    Date: Feb 09, 2020 to May 17, 2020
    Detail: Few artists in Chinese history have proven as enigmatic as the great Ming dynasty painter Qiu Ying (c. 1494–c. 1552), whose life and art reveal a series of paradoxes. Though one of the most famous artists of the Ming period, almost nothing is known about his life. He is said to have been illiterate, yet surviving evidence demonstrates elegant writing. He is said to have had few followers, yet he was the most copied painter in Chinese history. Where the Truth Lies grapples with such issues as artists who cross social boundaries, literacy, and the importance of connoisseurship in determining quality and authenticity. This will be the first exhibition on Qiu Ying ever organized outside of China and Taiwan. In addition to masterworks by Qiu Ying, the exhibition will include works by his predecessors and teachers, his daughter Qiu Zhu, and followers from the early 16th through the mid-20th century.


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    New The Art of Impermanence: Japanese Works from the John C. Weber Collection and Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection
    Place: Asia Society Museum - New York, 725 Park Avenue, USA
    Date: Feb 11, 2020 to Apr 26, 2020
    Detail: Impermanence is a pervasive subject in Japanese thought and art. Through masterpieces of calligraphy, painting, sculpture, ceramics, lacquers, and textiles drawn from two of America’s greatest Japanese art collections, this exhibition examines Japan's unique and nuanced references to transience. Objects span from the Jōmon period to the twentieth century. From images which depict the cycle of the four seasons and red negoro lacquer worn so it reveals the black lacquer beneath, to the gentle sadness evoked in the words of wistfully written poems, the exhibition demonstrates that much of Japan's greatest art alludes directly or indirectly to the transient nature of life.


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    New Samurai, Ghosts and Lovers: Yoshitoshi’s Complete 100 Aspects of the Moon
    Place: Dayton Art Institute - Dayton, 456 Belmonte Park North, Ohio, USA
    Date: Feb 22, 2020 to May 03, 2020
    Detail: A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see all 100 works in Tsukioka Yoshitoshi’s epic series 100 Aspects of the Moon. One of the outstanding series in the history of Japanese woodblock prints, it represents the culmination of the artist’s career.

    This series is a tour-de-force, combining diverse, striking designs with dramatic, historical and mythical stories from Japan’s past, including samurai warriors and court ladies. The prints depict Shakespearean emotion–valor and wit, stories of the heart, drama and enchantment–and they are all linked by the presence of the moon. Together they form a concentrated introduction to Japanese culture, including its history, aesthetics, music, literature, performing arts, religions, and festivals.


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    New Blue Night, Red Earth: The Work of Nguyen Cam
    Place: Rosenberg & Co. - New York, 19 East 66th Street, USA
    Date: Feb 24, 2020 to Apr 18, 2020
    Detail: Rosenberg & Co. is honored to present Blue Night, Red Earth: The Work of Nguyen Cam, the first solo exhibition in New York by the Vietnamese artist.

    Internationally recognized with exhibitions in Paris, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Washington, D.C., Brussels, and Barcelona, Blue Night, Red Earth is Nguyen Cam’s first solo show in New York City. Fusing the material standards of Vietnam’s complex art history with the abstract sensibilities of European modernism, Cam occupies a unique place as an international contemporary artist with a visual language unmistakably his own. Created within the last two decades, the works included in Blue Night, Red Earth exemplify the mature style Cam has developed after a lifetime of stylistic and material experimentation. His canvases manifest a calm power, and the surprising balance of color, figure, and material feels both ancient and highly contemporary.


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    New Boro Textiles: Sustainable Aesthetics
    Place: Japan Society - New York, 333 East 47th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 06, 2020 to Jun 14, 2020
    Detail: Boro Textiles: Sustainable Aesthetics situates traditional Japanese textiles alongside contemporary works by three influential creators: Susan Cianciolo; Christina Kim; and Junya – for Comme des Garcons. The installation rediscovers this traditional handcraft, its history of survival and ingenuity, and its continued influence on creative practices today.

    Related Program
    Japanese Art Society of America Annual Lecture
    Sunday, March 15, 11am


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    New Forgotten Faces: Visual Representation of Trauma and Mass Killings in Asia
    Place: The Charles B. Wang Center - New York, 100 Nicolls Road, USA
    Date: Mar 12, 2020 to Jun 14, 2020
    Detail: Opening Reception: Thursday, March 12, 5–7pm
    Free but RSVP required

    Curated by Jinyoung A. Jin, Forgotten Faces traces the cultural phenomenon of mass killings in Asia, where untold numbers of civilians died as a result of colonialism, Cold War politics, unstable nation-state systems, capitalism, globalization, social and economic inequality, and growing ecological challenges. This exhibition reveals the links between these crimes against humanity and works of art from Cambodia, India, South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. These works illustrate the tensions between journalism and aesthetics, and documentation of unspeakable acts and a crisis of representation.


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    New The Pursuit of Salvation: Jain Art from India
    Place: New Orleans Museum of Art - New Orleans, One Collins C. Diboll Circle, City Park, USA
    Date: Mar 13, 2020 to Jun 07, 2020
    Detail: The Jain faith has been continuously practiced in India since at least the sixth century BCE. Nonviolence, a respect for all living beings, and the belief in the existence of a permanent soul whose true nature is obscured by accumulated karma are core principles of Jainism. Created over a period of more than fifteen hundred years — the second through nineteenth centuries — the sculptures, paintings, and manuscripts on view in this exhibition of works loaned from the collection of Dr. Siddharth Bhansali illuminate iconographic and stylistic change as well as regional variation.

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    New Buddha and Shiva, Lotus and Dragon: Masterworks from the Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection at Asia Society
    Place: The New Orleans Museum of Art - New Orleans, One Collins C. Diboll Circle, City Park, Louisiana, USA
    Date: Mar 13, 2020 to Jun 07, 2020
    Detail: Presenting nearly seventy of the finest examples of Asian art in the United States, Buddha and Shiva, Lotus and Dragon showcases the broad range of bronzes, ceramics, and metalwork assembled by John D. Rockefeller 3rd (1906–1978) and his wife Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller (1909–1992) between the 1940s and the 1970s. With highlights including Chinese vases, Indian Chola bronzes, and Southeast Asian sculptures, the collection reveals great achievements in Asian art spanning more than two millennia. Featuring works from across the Asian continent—Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tibet, and Vietnam, the selection of masterpieces presented in Buddha and Shiva, Lotus and Dragon illuminates social and artistic histories from across Asia and underscores the visual arts’ capacity to encourage cross-cultural dialogue.

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    New Yoshitomo Nara
    Place: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, BCAM, Level 2 - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., California, USA
    Date: Apr 05, 2020 to Aug 02, 2020
    Detail: Yoshitomo Nara is among the most beloved Japanese artists of his generation. His widely recognizable portraits of menacing figures reflect the artist’s raw encounters with his inner self. A peripatetic traveler, Nara’s oeuvre takes inspiration from a wide range of resources—memories of his childhood, music, literature, studying and living in Germany (1988–2000), exploring his roots in Japan, Sakhalin, and Asia, and modern art from Europe and Japan. Spanning over 30 years from 1987 to 2020, Yoshitomo Nara views the artist’s work through the lens of his longtime passion—music. Featuring album covers Nara began collecting as an adolescent, paintings, drawings, sculpture, ceramics, an installation that recreates his drawing studio, and never-before-exhibited idea sketches that reflect the artist’s empathic eye, this exhibition shines a light on Nara’s conceptual process. One of the main highlights will be Miss Forest, a 26-foot outdoor painted bronze sculpture that will grace Wilshire Boulevard.


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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    New CAI GUO-QIANG GUNPOWDER ART
    Place: Ashmolean Museum - Oxford, United Kingdom
    Date: Oct 25, 2019 to Apr 19, 2020
    Detail: Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang (b. 1957) is best-known for his gunpowder explosion events staged in public spaces worldwide and, in particular, for his firework display for the opening ceremonies of the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. This exhibition focuses on the artist’s smaller-scale works, exploring the presence of Chinese culture in his art through the mediums of painting, drawing, and gunpowder on canvas, paper and silk. Learn about the significance behind the materials Cai Guo-Qiang chooses to work with, as well as the ways he adapts them to explore his own central themes of creation, destruction and chance.


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    New Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk
    Place: Victoria and Albert Museum - London, Cromwell Road, United Kingdom
    Date: Feb 29, 2020 to Jun 21, 2020
    Detail: This exhibition will present the kimono as a dynamic and constantly evolving icon of fashion, revealing the sartorial, aesthetic and social significance of the garment from the 1660s to the present day, both in Japan and the rest of the world.


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    New ART IN CHINA 1949–1979
    Place: Ashmolean Museum - Oxford, Beaumont Street, United Kingdom
    Date: May 02, 2020 to Oct 04, 2020
    Detail: This exhibition covers the period from the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 to shortly after the death of Chairman Mao Zedong in 1976. It explores the significant changes that occurred in Chinese art over a period of thirty years that saw destruction, hardship and famine as well as the reconstruction of a new China based on communist principles.

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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    New Nestorian Crosses of the Yuan Dynasty
    Place: University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong - Hong Kong, 90 Bonham Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
    Date: Jun 10, 2016 to Dec 31, 2022
    Detail: The University of Hong Kong’s (HKU) Nestorian crosses were assembled by a Mr. F. A. Nixon who served as a British postal commissioner in Beijing in the 1930s and 1940s. Subsequently the collection was acquired by the Lee Hysan Foundation and donated to Hong Kong University in 1961.

    Nestorian bronze crosses were cast in the Ordos region in north-west China (Inner Mongolia) during the Yuan dynasty (1272–1368). They measure between 3 and 8 cm in height, are flat plaque-like ornaments with an outline in high relief and have a loop on the back suggesting that they were used as personal seals and were worn on the body. The loop facilitates a strapping to human clothing or girdles. The fine motifs of the cast Christian and Buddhist symbols and the rare survival of red-coloured ink deposits in intermittent lower parts of the design, suggested that these seals were used as chops and transferred their individual designs by printing them on other matters. Although all crosses are cast, the Nestorian crosses all seem to be unique and are, in fact, characteristic for their individual designs.

    Stylistically, all crosses fall into 4 different categories, many with mixed Christian and Buddhist motifs in the same artefact. The majority are executed in crucifix form—hence the group description as ‘crosses’—with either flat or round ends. Other ‘crosses’ in fact take the shape of animals, predominantly birds, but also hares and fish, as well as geometrical patterns, such as sun-like designs and miscellaneous Chinese seal-like forms.


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    New Ancient Religions
    Place: Asian Civilisations Museum - Singapore, 1 Empress Place, Singapore
    Date: Dec 12, 2017 to Dec 31, 2021
    Detail: The ACM permanent galleries on Level 2 explore how artists have masterfully expressed complex ideas about life and existence with religions in sculpture and paintings. Beginning with the Ancient Religions exhibition, which explores early styles and motifs of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism in India and how they spread to China and the larger Southeast Asia, the story continues in the following galleries as the art developed and evolved through the centuries.

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    New A Falcon’s Eye: Tribute to Sheikh Saoud Al Thani
    Place: Museum of Islamic Art - Doha, Qatar
    Date: Mar 25, 2020 to Jan 21, 2021
    Detail: Qatar Museums presents A Falcon's Eye: Tribute to Sheikh Saoud Al Thani, an exhibition that celebrates the outstanding accomplishments of one of Qatar’ greatest collectors who was largely responsible for laying the foundation for Qatar Museum’s world class collections. The exhibition showcases more than 300 outstanding art works from prehistoric fossils and Egyptian antiquities to Orientalist paintings and masterpieces of the history of photography in a spectacular display following the concept of ancient (Renaissance) “cabinet of curiosities” reflecting Sheikh Saoud’s fascination with both natural history and the art world.

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    New The Esthetics of Cha no Yu
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Apr 04, 2020 to May 24, 2020
    Detail: The practice of drinking tea was introduced to Japan with Zen Buddhism during the Kamakura period. It formed into a tea culture in Japan over the Muromachi, Momoyama and Edo periods, reflecting Japanese esthetics of wabi and sabi. As the art of tea ceremony, or cha no yu, developed, many art pieces were appreciated and utilized for the practice. This exhibition will display masterpieces selected from the Idemitsu collection, from the viewpoint ofcha no yu. With items of arts and crafts, ranging from calligraphy, paintings, to ceramics such as karamono and raku tea bowls that Japanese cherished, we will introduce the variety of art related to cha no yu.

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    New Hand Painted Ukiyo-e — From Moronobu to Shunshō, Utamaro and Hokusai
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Jun 06, 2020 to Jul 12, 2020
    Detail: Ukiyo-e colored the history of art of the Edo period. Generally, prints are its well-known form, but from the 17th to 19th centuries, many of the ukiyo-e artists not only made sketches for prints but also left original paintings that required engagement in every step of the production. This exhibition will approach the creative power of expressive techniques, which were unraveled by discoveries from conservation work of recent years. We hope that you will enjoy through this show, the brilliance of color, as well as the lively brushwork distinctive to hand painted ukiyo-e.

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    New Painted Folding Screens, Byōbu-e — Brilliance of the Japanese Esthetic
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Jul 18, 2020 to Sep 06, 2020
    Detail: Byōbu, literally, is a screen to prevent wind from blowing into a room, and its broad painting surface was ideal for painting. The gorgeous painted folding screens colored the lives of the Japanese people and decorated their ceremonial occasions. They became a representative form of Japanese painting that gained popularity outside of Japan as well. This exhibition will feature its appeal and show the phases of its unique development through brilliant examples of yamato-e, genre paintings, and rakuchū rakugai zu (paintings of scenes in and around Kyoto).


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    New The Flower of Edo Paintings
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Sep 19, 2020 to Dec 20, 2020
    Detail: About eighty masterpieces from the newly acquired former Etsuko and Joe Price Collection (Price Foundation) will be selected for exhibition in two parts. Part I features pieces such as the epoch-making Chōjū Kaboku Zu Byōbu (Mosaic Screens of Birds, Animals and Flowering Plants) by Itō Jakuchū, as well as the masterpieces of hand-painted ukiyo-e and genre paintings that show detailed depiction and rich expression. In Part II, you will be able to enjoy the world of Maruyama Ōkyo who led the Kyoto painting circle, and his disciples, and the sophistication of Edo Rimpa represented by Sakai Hōitsu and Suzuki Kiitsu.


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    New 100 Masterpieces Selected of Sengai
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Jan 09, 2021 to Feb 11, 2021
    Detail: The year 2020 marks the 270th year of birth of Sengai. To commemorate this special year, 100 masterpieces including, “Hotei (Budai) Pointing at the Moon,” “The Universe” and “The Willow,” are carefully selected for this ultimate show. It will be a show in which you will be able to encounter paintings and warm messages by Sengai and also discover the real image of this mon, yet not revealed, which will satisfy not only the enthusiasts but also the beginners, hoping to meet the expectations of every fan.


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    New Ceramics of the East — Artistic Exchange in Asian Art
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Feb 20, 2021 to Mar 28, 2021
    Detail: Masterpieces from the ceramics collection of the Museum, featuring items from Japan, China and the Korean peninsula will be displayed. From the old days, Asian people created a variety of ceramics, such as celadon, white porcelain and iro-e (overglaze enameled ware), and developed their own ceramic culture as a result of exchange with other countries. This exhibition will focus on the the exchange and introduce the appeal of Asian ceramics. There will also be a special section honoring the achievements of the researcher of ceramics, Koyama Fujio (1900–1975).

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    Fairs
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    New India Art Festival
    Place: Nehru Centre - Mumbai, India
    Date: Jan 09, 2020 to Nov 29, 2020
    Detail: India Art Festival, a contemporary art fair founded in 2011 is a new model for dialogue and collaborations between art galleries, art dealers, art buyers, artists, interior designer, architects and art connoisseurs who come together every year under roof. India Art Festival (IAF) along with mid-level and major art galleries also provides the opportunity to emerging, independent artists to get discovered and enjoy the attention along with the established artists.

    Mumbai Edition
    09 to 12 January 2020
    Nehru Centre, Mumbai

    Bengaluru Edition
    24 to 26 April 2020
    CKP Art Complex Bengaluru

    New Delhi Edition
    26 to 29 November 2020
    Thyagaraj Stadium, New Delhi

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    Exhibition Private
    USA & Canada Europe & Africa | Asia

    New The Breath of Clay – Bizen Works by Koichiro Isezaki
    Place: Ippodo Gallery - New York, 32 East 67th Street, 3rd Floor, USA
    Date: Mar 12, 2020 to Apr 16, 2020
    Detail: OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND
    MARCH 14–15
    Saturday and Sunday, 10am–6pm

    HOURS
    Daily, 10am–6pm
    (otherwise by appointment)

    OPENING PARTY
    Thursday, March 12, 5–8pm

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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    New Fondazione Prada Presents “Storytelling”, an Exhibition by Liu Ye
    Place: Fondazione Prada Milan - Nord Gallery - Milano, Italy
    Date: Jan 30, 2020 to Sep 28, 2020
    Detail: Fondazione Prada presents “Storytelling”, a solo show by Chinese painter Liu Ye curated by Udo Kittelmann. On view from 30 January to 28 September 2020 (press preview on 29 January), it will take place in Nord gallery at Fondazione Prada’s Milan venue. Following the first iteration held in 2018 at Prada Rong Zhai in Shanghai, the exhibition travels to Milan for a new presentation, featuring a selection of 35 paintings realized from 1992 onwards.

    In Shanghai Liu Ye's works related harmoniously with the 1918 historical residence’s original furnishings, decorations and colours, creating a symbiotic relationship with the intimate spaces and small rooms of Prada Rong Zhai. In Milan the paintings will generate a chromatic and material contrast with the concrete walls and the industrial environment of Fondazione Prada’s venue, in order to activate a new narrative sequence and an enigmatic contrast with these large exhibition spaces. The geographical dislocation will contribute to focus on the ability of Liu Ye to create a personal pictorial universe, which does not align with any particular artistic movement.

    Liu Ye expresses an intimate and sensual imagination, that feeds on heterogeneous sources related to literature, history of art and popular culture from the Western and Eastern world, giving rise to atmospheres which evoke introspection, purity and suspension. In the artist’s body of works the stylistic features of fairy-tales coexist with a sense of humor and a parodic vein. Referring to his own artistic production, Liu Ye underlined that “every work is my self portrait”.

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    Conference/Symposium
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    New Artist’s Perspective with Rose Bratcher on Buddha and Shiva, Lotus and Dragon
    Place: New Orleans Museum of Art - New Orleans, One Collins C. Diboll Circle, City Park, USA
    Date: May 16, 2020
    Detail:

    Throughout the exhibition Buddha and Shiva, Lotus and Dragon: Masterworks from the Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection at Asia Societyartists influenced by Asian aesthetics will offer their perspective on the objects on view.


    Rose Bratcher is an ensō painter and a monk at the New Orleans Zen Temple. In Zen, ensō is a circle that is hand-drawn in one or two uninhibited brushstrokes to express a moment when the mind is free to let the body create. The ensō symbolizes absolute enlightenment, strength, elegance, the universe, and mu (the void). It is characterised by a minimalism born of Japanese aesthetics.



    Date: Sat, May 16th
    Time: 12:00 PM
    Event Categories: Artist Perspectives, Talks and Tours


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